Summer 2020 Webinar Series

NALSAP Summer Webinar Series

The National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals is excited to offer our first Summer Webinar Series.  These exceptional presenters were scheduled to present at the Fourth Annual NALSAP Conference in Denver, CO.  However, due to COVID-19, we had to change our plans.  We are delighted that they have agreed to present their content through our Summer Webinar Series.

 

This series is for members only.  Make sure your log in as an Institutional Member Employee or Individual Member to register. 

For information on becoming a NALSAP Member, please go to our Membership Page.  If your employer is already an institutional member, reach out to your school's main contact to get the link to join NALSAP for free under your institution's account.  If you are not sure who your school's main contact is, email info@nalsap.org

 

Participants must register for each webinar separately.

 

WEBINAR SCHEDULE

Tuesday, June 2, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Using our power for good: cultivating inclusion and belonging for marginalized students


Tuesday, June 16, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Conflict management for law students (and us!)

 

Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

What's Love got to do with it?  Shifting our students' concept of success

The NALSAP Annual Business Meeting will follow the June 30th Webinar at 12:00 pm PDT / 2:00 pm CDT / 3:00 pm EDT.  Please stay on to hear important updates from the NALSAP Board, vote on slate for the Board, as well as our 2020 awards and recognition of members!

 

Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Elections 2020: A survival guide for law schools

 

Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

is anyone reading this? connecting with and engaging the current generation of law students


WEBINAR Descriptions

Webinar Session I

Using our power for good: cultivating inclusion and belonging for marginalized students

Tuesday, June 2, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Our roles and responsibilities as student affairs professionals include the cultivation of inclusive and equitable learning environments for students.  When it comes to conversations on race, socio-economic status, religion, gender, sexuality, physical capabilities, mental health, U.S. citizenship, and/or people whose parents did not attend college... we need to develop our capacity to discuss and advocate on these issues candidly and frequently.  This session will help us examine our own personal responsibilities in addressing blind-spots, ignorance, and unintentional minimizing of diverse student needs.  Participants will leave with tools, tips, and resources to continue their personal and professional practice with intention and purpose.  Ultimately, we seek to identify way our power, privilege, and influence can be utilized to create more welcoming, supportive, non-judgemental spaces so all students feel included, celebrated, and championed.

Presenters

  • Maya Dimant, George Washington University Law School, Visiting Associate Professor of Clinical Law
  • Chris Esparza, University of Oregon School of Law, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Leadership Development

 

Webinar Session II

Conflict management for law students (and us!)

Tuesday, June 16, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Dear Dean Solver:

I was VERY upset to learn that Other Viewpoint Org will be putting on a program regarding Upsetting Topic.  I did not come to law school to have to deal with this while also concentrating on studying and getting a job.  I demand that the students involved be immediately stopped, that the Dean make a community statement condemning their actions and in support of Right Viewpoint, and that we have a Town Hall to air our grievances against OVO.  Please respond immediately with your proposed solution.  Signed, Tuition Payer

Is there another way?  Can we provide students with tools need to engage in conflict in a healthy and productive way?

Why Conflict Management?

  1. For a more welcoming community;
  2. to encourage hot topic civil discourse;
  3. to teach an important legal skill; and
  4. to allow students to solve their own issues without demanding a top-down solution from their student affairs professionals.

How can we provide conflict management training?  Three specific exercises will be modeled (time permitting) that can then be utilized with students.  Exercises remind students to look for the win/win; to remain empathetic; and to understand style preferences and the impact of those preferences on getting to a solution.

Where can we implement change? The presenters will share ideas and examples (from their schools or other best practices) of places that conflict management education has or could occur.  The audience will then be encouraged to consider how they will take action at their schools.

Presenters

  • Elizabeth Ewert, George Washington Law School, Associate Dean of Students
  • Macey Edmondson, University of Mississippi School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Trenya Mason, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Assistant Dean of Law Student Affairs

 

Webinar Session III

What's Love got to do with it?  Shifting our students' concept of success

Tuesday, June 30, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Description TBA

Presenter

  • Larry Krieger, Florida State University College of Law, Professor

 

NALSAP Business Meeting to follow at 12:00 pm PDT / 2:00 pm CDT / 3:00 pm EDT


Webinar Session IV

Elections 2020: A survival guide for law schools

Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

This program will address a range of complex issues law school student services offices are likely to confront over the course of the upcoming national election cycle. Examples include:

  • balancing students’ desire to engage in partisan political activity on campus with a law school’s requirement as a tax-exempt organization to not promote individual political candidates or parties;
  • ways to promote productive dialogue across difference against the backdrop of divisive candidate rhetoric and a deeply polarized polity;
  • the pros and cons of designating campus “speech zones” and various forms of time/place/manner restriction on student (and staff and faculty) expression;
  • preparing for the possibility of widespread campus protests of controversial speakers or election results;
  • the impact of closing (or not closing) school to accommodate student participation in election day/week political activity;
  • the roles and needs of various student affinity groups throughout the election cycle;
  • the potential benefits of establishing a standing student/staff/faculty speech and expression committee to address complicated campus speech issues;
  • and best practices for supporting students distressed by election results or divisive politics without taking (or being perceived to take) a partisan stance as a school or student services office.

Presenters

  • Mitch Bailin, Georgetown University Law Center,Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
  • Nicole Sandoz, Georgetown University Law Center, Director of Student Life

 

Webinar Session V

is anyone reading this? connecting with and engaging the current generation of law students

Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | 11:00 am PDT / 1:00  pm CDT / 2:00 pm EDT

Gen Z has now started to enter law school.  Although research tells us that this generation of law students may need more and different support than their millennial predecessors, it has become increasingly difficult to engage these students through email and other traditional communication tools.  In this facilitated discussion we will discuss new tools for communicating with and engaging you law students.  A particular emphasis will be placed on tools for increasing student attendance at co-curricular and wellness events, and encouraging students to take advantage of campus resources for academic support.  The following questions will also be discussed:

  • In an era of email inundation, hwo have you made sure students are reading their emails and absorbing important institutional messaging?
  • Now more than ever, it seems like students need practical tools to manage stress, anxiety, and substance use.  How have you incentivized students to attend events on these topics and convince them that this is an important piece of becoming an ethical attorney.
  • For millennial student affairs professionals, how can you use your relative youth as an advantage to connecting with young law students?  What challenges have you faced as a young student affairs professional?
  • How can you serve as an advocate to faculty and more senior staff for the specific needs of the current generation of law students?

Presenters

  • Emily Haan, UC Hastings College of Law, Director of Student Services
  • Jonathan Myers, UC Hastings College of Law, Associate Director for Academic Advising and Programming