Schedule

Fourth Annual NALSAP Conference

June 17-19, 2020 in Denver, C.O.


The Fourth Annual National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals Conference will be held at University of Denver Sturm College of Law in Denver, C.O., from June 17-19, 2020.

 

 

CLE Credit

More information coming soon.

 

Conference Schedule

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Time

Description

12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

New (& Newer) Professionals Workshop Add-On (separate registration required)

12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Well-Being Skills for the Effective Law Student Workshop Add-On 
(separate registration required)

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Early Conference Check-In and Networking Reception at the Courtyard Denver Cherry Creek, 1475 S. Colorado Blvd, Denver, C.O.

 

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Time

Description

8:00 – 9:00 am

Conference Check-In and Networking

8:00 - 9:00 am
First Time Attendee Meeting

9:00 – 10:15 am

Welcome and Keynote by Larry Krieger

10:30 – 12:00 pm

Concurrent Session I

12:00 - 1:15 pm

Vendor Fair

12:00– 1:15 pm

Lunch

1:15 – 2:30 pm

Plenary Session I

2:30 – 2:45 pm

Networking Break

2:45 – 3:45 pm

Concurrent Session II

4:00 – 4:30 pm

Concurrent Session III

4:45 – 5:15 pm

Concurrent Session IV

 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Welcome Reception & Vendor Fair

7:00 pm

Dine Around Town

 

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Time

Description

6:00 – 6:45 am

Walk/Run

9:00 – 10:15 am

Plenary Session II

10:15 – 10:30 am

Break

10:30 – 11:45 am

Concurrent Session V

11:45 am – 1:30 pm

Vendor Fair

11:45 am – 1:15 pm

Lunch

12:15 – 1:15 pm

Business Meeting (during lunch)

1:30 – 2:45 pm

Concurrent Session VI

2:45 – 3:15 pm

Networking Break & Vendor Fair

3:15 – 4:15 pm

Concurrent Session VII

4:30 - 5:30 pm
 Plenary III

6:00 pm

Play Around Town (or other group activities)

 

Friday, June 19, 2020

Time

Description

6:30 7:15 am

Walk/Run

8:45 – 9:45 am

Round-table Discussion Topics

Dean of Students Meeting

10:00 – 11:00 am

Concurrent Session VIII

11:00 – 11:15 am

Break

11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Plenary Session IV

12:30 – 1:45 pm

Networking Lunch and Closing Remarks

 

This schedule is current as of March 3, 2020, but may change as the conference approaches. 

 

Session Descriptions

Plenary Session I

is anyone reading this? connecting with and engaging the current generation of law students

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 1:15 – 2:30 pm

Gen Z has now started to enter law school.  Although research tells us that this generation of law students may need more and different support than their millennial predecessors, it has become increasingly difficult to engage these students through email and other traditional communication tools.  In this facilitated discussion we will discuss new tools for communicating with and engaging you law students.  A particular emphasis will be placed on tools for increasing student attendance at co-curricular and wellness events, and encouraging students to take advantage of campus resources for academic support.  The following questions will also be discussed:

  • In an era of email inundation, hwo have you made sure students are reading their emails and absorbing important institutional messaging?
  • Now more than ever, it seems like students need practical tools to manage stress, anxiety, and substance use.  How have you incentivized students to attend events on these topics and convince them that this is an important piece of becoming an ethical attorney.
  • For millennial student affairs professionals, how can you use your relative youth as an advantage to connecting with young law students?  What challenges have you faced as a young student affairs professional?
  • How can you serve as an advocate to faculty and more senior staff for the specific needs of the current generation of law students?

Presenters

  • Emily Haan, UC Hastings College of Law, Director of Student Services
  • Jonathan Myers, UC Hastings College of Law, Associate Director for Academic Advising and Programming

 

Plenary Session II

Conflict management for law students (and us!)

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 9:00 – 10:15 am

Dear Dean Solver:

I was VERY upset to learn that Other Viewpoint Org will be putting on a program regarding Upsetting Topic.  I did not come to law school to have to deal with this while also concentrating on studying and getting a job.  I demand that the students involved be immediately stopped, that the Dean make a community statement condemning their actions and in support of Right Viewpoint, and that we have a Town Hall to air our grievances against OVO.  Please respond immediately with your proposed solution.  Signed, Tuition Payer

Is there another way?  Can we provide students with tools need to engage in conflict in a healthy and productive way?

Why Conflict Management?

  1. For a more welcoming community;
  2. to encourage hot topic civil discourse;
  3. to teach an important legal skill; and
  4. to allow students to solve their own issues without demanding a top-down solution from their student affairs professionals.

How can we provide conflict management training?  Three specific exercises will be modeled (time permitting) that can then be utilized with students.  Exercises remind students to look for the win/win; to remain empathetic; and to understand style preferences and the impact of those preferences on getting to a solution.

Where can we implement change? The presenters will share ideas and examples (from their schools or other best practices) of places that conflict management education has or could occur.  The audience will then be encouraged to consider how they will take action at their schools.

Presenters

  • Elizabeth Ewert, George Washington Law School, Associate Dean of Students
  • Macey Edmondson, University of Mississippi School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Trenya Mason, Washington and Lee University School of Law, Assistant Dean of Law Student Affairs

 

Plenary Session III

Elections 2020: A survival guide for law schools

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 4:30 – 5:30 pm

This program will address a range of complex issues law school student services offices are likely to confront over the course of the upcoming national election cycle. Examples include:

  • balancing students’ desire to engage in partisan political activity on campus with a law school’s requirement as a tax-exempt organization to not promote individual political candidates or parties;
  • ways to promote productive dialogue across difference against the backdrop of divisive candidate rhetoric and a deeply polarized polity;
  • the pros and cons of designating campus “speech zones” and various forms of time/place/manner restriction on student (and staff and faculty) expression;
  • preparing for the possibility of widespread campus protests of controversial speakers or election results;
  • the impact of closing (or not closing) school to accommodate student participation in election day/week political activity;
  • the roles and needs of various student affinity groups throughout the election cycle;
  • the potential benefits of establishing a standing student/staff/faculty speech and expression committee to address complicated campus speech issues;
  • and best practices for supporting students distressed by election results or divisive politics without taking (or being perceived to take) a partisan stance as a school or student services office.

Presenters

  • TBA

 

Plenary Session IV

Using our power for good: cultivating inclusion and belonging for marginalized students

Friday, June 19, 2020 | 11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Our roles and responsibilities as student affairs professionals include the cultivation of inclusive and equitable learning environments for students.  When it comes to conversations on race, socio-economic status, religion, gender, sexuality, physical capabilities, mental health, U.S. citizenship, and/or people whose parents did not attend college... we need to develop our capacity to discuss and advocate on these issues candidly and frequently.  This session will help us examine our own personal responsibilities in addressing blind-spots, ignorance, and unintentional minimizing of diverse student needs.  Participants will leave with tools, tips, and resources to continue their personal and professional practice with intention and purpose.  Ultimately, we seek to identify way our power, privilege, and influence can be utilized to create more welcoming, supportive, non-judgemental spaces so all students feel included, celebrated, and championed.

Presenters

  • Maya Dimant, George Washington University Law School, Visiting Associate Professor of Clinical Law
  • Chris Esparza, University of Oregon School of Law, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Leadership Development

 

Concurrent Session I

IA - introduction to facilitative mediation as a student affairs tool

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

This session will introduce participants to the concept of facilitative mediation, a method of conflict resolution that focuses on moving parties from their positions to understanding one anothers needs and interests.  The method also helps facilitate the parties coming to a resolution that best meets their needs and interests.  Whether you are a student affairs administrator or a diversity and inclusion administrator, the concepts of facilitative mediation can prove to be essential in helping parties and constituencies better navigate conflict in a healthy and productive manner.

Presenter

  • Shannon Bartlett, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, Associate Dean, Inclusion & Engagement

 

IB - Thinking outside the vacuum: Rethinking diversity and inclusion to foster a culture of care

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Law schools throughout the country seek to diversify the profession and admit students who can accomplish this goal.  However that happens when we pigeon hole students into distinctive categories and enable them?  How do we create inclusive lawyers and thinkers?  During this session, we'll discuss how law schools reinforce a compartmentalized approach to students and student issues.  We'll examine how we can look beyond the socio-cultural vacuums we recreate and break them to look at the whole student.  Finally, we'll examine how faculty and administrators can be inclusive and transformational leaders by fostering a culture of care in and outside of the classroom.

Presenters

  • Yvette Wilson-Barnes, CUNY School of Law, Associate Dean, Student Affairs
  • Amanda Beltran, CUNY School of Law, Director of Student Activities, Interim Director of Student Affairs

 

Ic - Facing ambiguity with an improvisation lens: letting go, noticing more, & using everything

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

In everyday conversations, when people use the word improvise they often mean making do out of what is conveniently on hand.  The improvisation done daily is a kind of pragmatic inventiveness that meets the needs of our particular situations.  People substitute ingredients in a recipe, take detours to avoid street construction, and use symbols and gestures in place of words to try to communicate their inner states.  From an artistic/performance lens, improvisation infers a little more - namely, letting go, noticing more, and using everything.

This session will utilize improvisation exercises as an experiential tool to assist in conceptualizing ways of connecting, collaborating, and dealing with change and complexity.  These activities will address various capacities of emotionally intelligent, adaptive, and affiliative leadership, including: flexibility, empathy, adaptability, solving problems, collaboration, building teams, managing conflict, and assessing the contextual environment.  Participants can expect to learn how to apply these activities in their own work, life and practice, particularly in the context of developing their leadership capacity in a purposeful and collaborative way.

No experience in improvisational theater will be necessary to participate - and, in fact, the session is designed with a "beginner" mindset that allows anyone willing to play and experiment within an emergent community to participate.  As in the world of improv, it is understood that when everyone is giving, everyone is also getting.

Presenter

  • Chris Esparza, University of Oregon School of Law, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Leadership Development


Concurrent Session II

IIA - faan the flames of student success

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 2:45 – 3:45 pm

We will present on a new initiative developed as a result of a conversation around genuine concerns about how to best serve our students who fit all or a combination of the following: Lower LSAT scores; first generation; underrepresented communities.  This concern arose out of a large number of these students facing academic risk after their 1L fall semester.  We recognized that many of these students lacked a feeling of community; embedded study skills; and knowing how to access overall support despite our efforts during Orientation to reach these students and offer services.  Out of this conversation we developed FAAN - First Year Academic Achievement Network - where we individually contacted all of the students below a certain LSAT number during the first week of class.  We then met with each of the approximately 80 students individually and discussed: student habits; had they discovered their community; knowledge of resources available to them.  We periodically checked in with these students to make sure they were feeling included and that they were aware that someone they knew was invested in their success.  We further developed detailed student timelines; matched students with resources such as academic support or counseling services.  We measured success by noting the significant reduction of students who appeared before our academic standing committee as opposed to the same demographic in years prior.  FAAN required no extra resources on our part, other than time and energy.  The feedback from students was overwhelmingly positive and appreciative.

Presenters

  • Ann Santos, Suffolk University Law School, Associate Dean of Students
  • Cherina Wright, Suffolk University Law School, Director of Student Engagement & Inclusion

 

IIB - The "A" word: An examination of how law schools address alcohol on campus

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 2:45 – 3:45 pm

We've all seen the statistics.  We know that alcohol use in a challenge that faces many in the legal profession.  In fact, a survey of over 12,000 attorneys concluded that "problematic drinking that is hazardous, harmful, or otherwise consistent with alcohol use disorders at a higher rate than other professional populations."  Their report found that over 20% of those surveyed tested positive for dangerous, alcohol-dependent drinking.  Moreover, those of use in Student Affairs are well-aware of the alcohol-related mental health and well-being issues plaguing law students.

So why then is there such variation on how schools approach alcohol consumption on campus?  Historically, law schools have had a very open and generous relationship with alcoholic beverages - kegs on the quad and logoed beer glasses as swag at orientation offer a few examples.  However, now more and more law schools are going "dry," but is that really the answer? Should we be teaching students how to drink responsibly in a professional setting, or should we be warning them of the dangers of alcohol?

We'll research schools' alcohol policies across the country and learn more about why each school is making their decisions about where they fall on the alcohol regulations spectrum.  We'll also provide feedback from students on these policies and offer information on how to welcome students in recovery and how to perform outreach on alcohol-dependent students.  Finally, we'll discuss secondary trauma as it relates to student affairs professional and provide resources and support for those that are interested.

Presenters

  • Jennifer Cerny, University of Connecticut School of Law, Executive Director of Student Affairs & Assistant Dean of Students
  • Amy Perez, University of Miami School of Law, Student Development Director

 

IIC - Being a non-jd in a jd WOrld: Battling the imposter Phenomenon

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 2:45 – 3:45 pm

Are you a Non-JD working at a law school?  Are you full of doubt and feeling inadequate?  Do you question your expertise and feel you don't belong?  This mindset can lead to self-doubt, stress, and be critical to our professional performance.  This workshop will explore the impostor phenomenon that a Non-JD working in a JD world may experience and discuss strategies to flip the script on this phenomenon.

Participants attending this session will explore the impostor phenomenon and way to overcome and regain confidence in their roles as a non-JD in a JD world.

Presenter

  • Misty Franklin, The University of Akron School of Law, Director of Online Learning and Academic Affairs

 

IID - Growth in first year courses/programs focused on professional formation

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 2:45 – 3:45 pm

Over the last few years there has been a significant growth in the number of law schools that require first-year students to take a course or participate in a program that either focuses upon professional formation or has integrated some aspects of professional formation.  This presentation would describe the variety of approaches law schools are taking with respect to required first-year engagements with professional formation and highlight some of the common aspects of these approaches.

Presenters

  • Rupa Bhandari,Santa Clara University School of Law, Assistant Dean & Adjunct Professor, Office of Career Management
  • Jerry Organ, St. Thomas University School of Law, Bakken Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions

 

Concurrent Session III

IIia - how drake law has improved attendance tracking accuracy and efficiency using student smartphones to capture attendance data

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:00 – 4:30 pm

This session will show how Drake University Law School is using the sEAtS Attendance Tracking Solution to improve the accuracy and efficiency of capturing student attendance data and addressing student attendance issues, as they arise, to improve student persistence and success.

sEAtS Software Student Attendance Tracking Solution: Student check into class using smartphones and the sEAtS free downloadable app. Attendance is transmitted by the phone to the sEAtS Cloud Service hosted by Microsoft Azure.  Faculty love the system because it frees them of the tedious task of taking attendance.  Students adopt the system easily because they are accustomed to using apps for so many things in their lives.

The User Interface provides Student Advisors, Registrars, Academic Leadership, and Financial Aid staff real-time data at their fingertips.  Access to the system is based on roles and permissions governed by each school so that only those with a need to know are allowed to access records.  The system eliminates frequent emails to instructors asking for attendance records and searching for records in various campus locations.

In addition to a number of delivered reports the system includes workflows that send automated communications to students missing class based on rules determined by the school.  This enables the school to focus on attendance issues as they arise and improves staff efficiency.

Presenters

  • Erin Lee-Schneider, Drake University Law School, Assistant Dean for Student Services
  • Jim Tully, sEAtS Software, V.P. Student Success Solutions

 

IIiB - Law school study skills as self-paced online instruction

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:00 – 4:30 pm

CALI has recently published a collection of 30 new interactive exercises for law students in Law School Study Skills.  This is a project supported with a grant from AccessLex and the authors are all excellent folks from the Academic Success community.  HEre are some of the titles of the lessions....

Assessing Your Own Work; Words Matter; The "A" in IRAC: Application and Analysis; Introduction to Rule Synthesis; Hyped about Hypos; Preparing for Class 101; What Not To Write; Notetaking in Law School 101; Finding the Rule; Analysis 1: Thinking Like a Lawyer; Issue Spotting; Preparing for and Organizing Exams; Metacognition; Multiple-Choice Questions: Wrong Answer Pathology; Outlining Basics; Reading Comprehension Strategies for Exams; Time Management; Creating Your Plan; Mechanics of Memorization; Legal Writing v. Exam Writing; A Methodical Approach to Improve Multiple-Choice Performance; Case Briefing; Excavating Faces from Cases.

In this talk, I will demo some of the lessons content and talk about CALI's rigorous editorial process and the Fellowship program.  I will also touch on CALI's 1000+ other lessons, free casebook project and free formative assessment software - QuizWright - that law faculty can use to create their own formative assessments.  There will be a pop quiz and attendees will take the quiz - real time - to see what you learn.

CALI is a non-profit consoritum of almost all US law schools - your law school is programly already a member, so all our materials are freely available to your faculty and students.

Presenter

  • John Mayer, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI), Executive Director

 

IIiC - LSAC Programs & SErvices beyond admissions

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:00 – 4:30 pm

LSAC will present on the various programs and services that serve students and law schools beyond the admissions process.  This will include an overview of the LSAT, LSAT writing, diversity & inclusion programs, and a general update. 

Presenter

  • Gisele Joachim, Law School Admission Council (LSAC), Director of LSAC Ambassadors

 

IIiD - Creating financially literate lawyers: your action plan

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:00 – 4:30 pm

Law students are busy, overwhelmed, and report high levels of anxiety - and low levels of literacy - about finances.  Without an intervention, they are likely to become busy, overwhelmed, anxious lawyers - who lack the confidence they need to make strong financial decisions for themselves or their clients.  In this session, you'll hear from your peers as to how they integrate financial capability programming into the law school experience and we'll walk you through the programming, outreach and practices that can build a more fiancially literate student body.  You'll emerge with an outline for a specific action plan, based on the challenges and opportunities on your campus, to build a student body with more knowledge and confidence about the money matters they face.

Presenter

  • Jacquie Carroll, AccessLex Institute - Center for Education and Financial Capability, Director of Curriculum & Instruction

 

Concurrent Session IV

IVa - building your conseling toolbox - simple techniques to use with your students

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:45 – 5:15 pm

We all serve as impromptu counselors during our time with students.  But, many of us do not have a counseling background.  The goal for this presentation is to provide attendess with real, concrete counseling tools to use with students.  You will leave the session and know how to use these few techniques and be able to implement them in your office immediately.

Presenter

  • Tina Jernigan, West Virginia University School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Life

 

IVB - North Star mentorship program: building a cohort mentorship program

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:45 – 5:15 pm

This program will describe an innovative program launched at Northwestern Law this year.  The program is built along the lines of the Posse program.  Designed to create a close-knit mentorship program throughout the first year of Law School, the small cohort of students are those who could benefit from additional socio-emotional support.  The program has been positively received by participants and the 3L students serving as mentors.  Attendees will learn about how the program has been structured and the ways in which it enhanced the first year experience for potentially vulnerable students.

Presenters

  • Shannon Bartlett, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, Associate Dean, Inclusion & Engagement
  • Candace Bergeron, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, Associate Director of Student Engagement & Community
  • Susie Spies Roth, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, Associate Dean and Dean of Students

 

IVC - Beyong ice breakers: a case student in merging academic support & Student affairs for orientation

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:45 – 5:15 pm

By the end of this workshop, participates will:
  • Learn the skills (academic and other) law students need to master in orientation to be successful in law school;
  • Learn how to teach these skills in an orientation program; and
  • Design an orientation session using the principles and tools provided.

Historically, the University of Kentucky College of Law had a three-day orientation program for students primarily focused on socialization, an introduction to classes, tours, and a very short introduction to reading and briefing caes.  UK Law also offered an Introduction to Legal Reasoning (ILR) program that provided students with four days of mock classes, as well as classes relating to critical reading, study skills, and general wellness.  While ILR was initially a small program consisting of about 15 students, it became extremely popular and demand grew beyond available space.  Because of this interest in ILR, in 2019 we revamped the Orientation program to include ILR.

The four goals of our new Orientation program were to create a strong community, introduce students to basic skills, provide students the opportunity to actively try law school classes, and encourage blaance in students' lives.  This workshop will first present research explaining the underlying basis for selecting these goals.  It will then present examples of lesson plans and exercises.  Finally, participants will discuss how these principles may be used to create activities or lesson plans for orientation at their institution, and may design an activity or lesson plan of their own related to these principles. 

Presenters

  • Jane Bloom Grise, University of Kentucky College of Law, Director of Academic Enhancement and Assistant Professor of Legal Writing
  • David Wright, University of Kentucky College of Law, Assistant Dean of Student Services

 

IVD - Influencing Students' sense of belonging

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 | 4:45 – 5:15 pm

Recent research has shown the importance of belonging in law students' performance and satisfaction outcomes, but what other factors affect, influence, and support students' sense of belong.  Using the 2018 LSSSE data that included a module with questions about students' experiences and perception around diversity sent to 20 law schools, this presentation will explore the influence that student affairs, relationships, and student engagemnt has on students' sense of belonging, especially for minoritized students.  The main two findings presented include:
  1. that law schools and law classrooms are not immune to sexism, racism, and the various social psychological phenomenon, such as stereotype threat.  Today, the feelings and experiences of otherness are disproportionally experienced by minioritized law students regardelss of institutional diversity; thus, highlighting the importance of understanding how these social forces come into play in law schools.
  2. that student affairs professionals are important to the student experience and they significantly and positively support students' sense of belonging, especially those experiencing bias, discrimination, and worry of being underestimated in law school.  This research reinforces that student affairs professionals matter and their work has a lasting impact.  Therefore, law schools are called to invest in their students by investing in those who support them academically, professionally, and emotionally: student affairs professionals.

This is a research presentation that I hope will inspire and motivate the attendees.

Presenter

  • Elizabeth Bodamer, Indiana University, ABF/AccessLex Institute Doctoral Fellow

 

Concurrent Session V

VA - Meeting (all of) them where they are: How to cultivate connection with your 1l class

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

Today's law students arrive on our doorstep with a wide range of personal and academic experiences, all of which influence their adjustment to law school. Last year's "73 Hours" plenary highlighted UConn Law's mandatory, individual 1L meetings as a best practice for detecting and assisting students experiencing issues related to their well-being, as well as for building community with and among the new class.  This program will take a deeper dive into the approaches taken by UConn Law, Miami Law, and KU Law to meet with their 1L students and achieve these important goals.

From the ability to identify and monitor mental health issues before they escalate, to aiding with the retention of potential transfer students, the presenters will discuss the many benefits and outcomes of the 1L meetings.  Workable solutions to challenges, such as the impact on departmental time and resources, will also be explored.  Special consideration will be given to how first generation and under-represented students, who may otherwise be less inclined to seek out guidance and support, benefit from individual connection with student affairs in the early days of law school.  Finally, the presenters will share how their approach led to increased collaboration with faculty and other key stakeholders within their law schools and universities.

Presenters

  • Jennifer Cerny, University of Connecticut School of Law, Executive Director of Student Affairs & Assistant Dean of Students
  • Amy Perez, University of Miami School of Law, Student Development Director
  • Leah Terranova, University of Kansas School of Law, Assistant Dean for Academic & Student Affairs

 

VB - using the reia (race equity impact assessment) to guide equitable decision making

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

Participants will learn how the Race Equity Impact Assessment (REIA) tool can be applied to law school decision making, in order to create a more inclusive law school environment for all members of the school community.  Participants will be asked to reflect upon a current policy or process used at their institution, and will use the REIA framework to evaluate and potentially modify the policy or process to achieve a more equitable outcome.

Presenters

  • Jordan Hall, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, Director of Student Affairs, Campus Equity and Inclusion
  • Megan Jennings, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, Associate Dean for Student Affairs

 

VC - What's next? growing your law school's wellness program

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

In recent years law student well-being has become a major focus and initiative for schools across the country.  Many law schools have implemented some version of a wellness program that consists of stress relief activities like yoga and meditation, and educational programs that focus on topics like burnout, resiliency, and stress management.  Although these prorams are important and address some aspects of wellness, they do not address all of the significant issues that impact this student population.  Many of the administrators running these programs find themselves asking what is next and wondering how to make a true difference and impact on student well-being, all while trying to navigate both budgetary and time constraints.

In this session we will discuss what the next steps are in growing your law school's wellness program and how to implement a program that effectively reaches students and permeates the law school culture.

Presenters

  • Candace Bergeron, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law, Associate Director of Student Engagement & Community
  • Jesse Landstrom, The University of Chicago School of Law, Associate Director of Student Affairs & Academic Services

 

VD - accommodations in clinical placements and externships

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

This session will cover how to support students with disabilities in clinical placements and externships.  First, the panel will briefly set out the legal framework around the duty to accommodate (this will be contextualized to Canadian law but will likely parallel similar legal frameworks in the US) and will consider the relationship between accommodating in an educational setting and a workplace setting.  Next, panel members will review case studies from their own law schools covering accommodations in clinical settings for both physical and mental health disabilities.  The panel will then review the unique considerations and challenges associated with accommodating students with disabilities in clinical settings and invite discussion and contributions from participants.  Finally, the panel will provide participants with suggestions for best practices based on policies and procedures they have put into place at their law schools, including a sample "accommodations in clinical settings protocol" - and will invite participants to share their own as well.

Presenters

  • Sara Faherty, University of Toronto Faculty of Law, Assistant Dean
  • Kaila Mikkelsen, Peter A. Allard School of Law, The University of British Columbia, Assistant Dean
  • Mya Rimon, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Assistant Dean

 

Concurrent Session VI

VIA - Best Practices for teaching leadership to today's law students

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 1:30 – 2:45 pm

This session is intended to present strategies and best practices for developing and teaching a Leadership course for law students.  Most of the panel, who recently developed and taught a credit-based Leadership course, will provide attendees with two different course models for teaching Leadership to law students.  Panelists will describe their skills and practice-based approaches to their different Leadership courses, which emphasized a variety of topics including effective communication techniques, project management, motivating a team, solving complex problems, proposing solutions, and presentation skills all grounded on leadership theory.

The presentation will also highlight the pedagogical value of teaching a skills-based leadership course in law school that incorporates theory and skills, and the process involved in seeking faculty approval for the course.  The goal of the presentation is to provide participants with tools and ideas for how to propose, develop, and teach leadership to law students and how to engage law students through interactive skills-building exercises.

Presenters

  • Alexis Martinez, Georgia State University College of Law, Associate Dean for Students
  • Rosemary Queenan, Albany Law School, Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Professor
  • Mary Walsh Fitzpatrick, Albany Law School, Assistant Dean

 

VIB - Call to action: colorado Supreme court's task force on lawyer well-being

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 1:30 – 2:45 pm

The Colorado Supreme Court created a Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being in September, 2018. The Task Force includes lawyers, judges, law school deans, law students, the Colorado Lawyer Assistance Program, the Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel, the Colorado Attorney Mentoring Program, and mental health professionals. The initial work and goals of the Task Force were described in the article Call to Action: The Colorado Supreme Court’s Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being, published in the Denver Law Review and authored by Supreme Court Justice Monica Marquez and Professional Development Counsel to the Office of Attorney Regulation Jonathan White.

 

This panel will include members of the Task Force. They will update attendees on the structural reforms under discussion by the Task Force for institutional change in law schools, law firms, and the bar admission process. The panel will also explore the benefits of law schools collaborating with other key stakeholders, as demonstrated by this innovative Task Force.


Moderator

  • Janet Stearns, University of Miami School of Law, Dean of Students

Panelists

  • The Honorable Monica Márquez, Justice for the Colorado Supreme Court
  • Sarah Myers, Executive Director of the Colorado Lawyer Assistance Program
  • Ryann Peyton, Colorado Attorney Mentoring Program, Director
  • Jessica Yates, Office of the Attorney Regulation Counsel, Attorney Regulation Counsel

 

VIC - <Accessible education session - title tbd>

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

More details coming.

Presenters

  • Mercedes Cannon, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, Associate Director, Adaptive Educational Services
  • Wende Ferguson, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Senior Associate Director for Student Affairs
  • Staci Rucker, University of Cinncinnati College of Law, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

 

Concurrent Session VII

VIIA - You can't spell nalsap without A-S-P

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

Academic support is a central function wintin all law school student affairs offices, even if it is not expressly listed on a team's position description.  Student Affairs professionals engage with academic support when addressing issues of imposter syndrome, microaggressions, time management, and/or exam performance.  We also support the academic mission through course advising, investigation of academic integrity violations, and/or counseling on personal well-bring issues.  Each of us is engaged, whether directly or indirectly, in helping students achieve academic success.

This session challenges the idea that acadmic support is inherently a function separate from student affairs.  Led by academic support professionals who are housed within student affairs offices, this session will survey the different types of organizational structures employed.  Further, a panel will discuss their experience as an academic support professional working within student affairs.  Attendees will leave with a greater recognition of their contributions as academic support professionals, models for how academic support contributions can be recognized within the student affairs umbrella, and top strategies used to address common academic performance issues.

Presenter

  • Andrew Realon, George Washington University Law School, Program Administrator for Academic Excellence

 

VIIB - When student services and faculty collide: working with faculty to ensure consistent messaging and rule administration

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

Student Services professionals are called upon to be the enforcers of rules governing students on a variety of subjects within the law school, such as graduation requirements, course registration, attendance policies, and exam accommodations, among others.  However, the inherent difficulty in this role is further complicated by the faculty who in most situations, have promulgated the rules.  Lack of faculty knowledge about the scope or details of current rules, the failure to take responsibility for unpopular rules, or the unwillingness of faculty to enforce rules which they passed make the student services professional's job even more complicated.

This discussion, lead by an academic dean and a dean of students, lays out the conflicts that student services professionals often encounter with their faculty when managing student expectations and administering and enforcing rules.  The session will provide an interactive, open and honest dialogue with the attendees about these situations and will offer an opportunity to share concrete tips and plans for working with faculty and other administrators to handle these, often delicate, situations.

Presenters

  • Michele Stuffolino, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Associate Dean of Students and Professor of Law
  • Debra Moss Vollweiler, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Interim Dean

 

VIIC - Navigating student concerns in politically charged times

Thursday, June 18, 2020 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

This past year, Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law an issue many educational institutions are facing in our current political climate: how to address students' right to free speech when that speech is offensive to other constituencies.  This topic touches many areas that student affairs professionals regularly deal with: promoting diversity and inclusion, ensuring student safety, and navigating university policies, among others.  The presenters will share their experience and discuss how student affairs professionals can manage similar situations on campus.  Strategies that empower constituents' voices and help them to feel heard and valued as members of an inclusive community will be discussed.  The session will conclude with breakout discussions on best practices and what to expect in the future.

Presenters

  • Nidhi Parikh Vogt, Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law, Associate Dean for Administration
  • Amy Rogan-Mehta, Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

 

Concurrent Session VIII

VIIIA - Thriving through transition

Friday, June 19, 2020 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

When leadership changes, it changes everything - your job, your institution's culture, even your students.  When the change happens to you (a dean transition) how can you help your students and colleagues navigate this change?  How can you provide stability, continue to innovate, and plan for a future when your school is going through a leadership transition?  How do you navigate the shifting power dynamics within the institution?  How do you explain to a new Dean the value you and your team bring to the institution without easily quantifiable metrics?  How can you help your department, and yourself, succeed when institutional priorities are in flux?

WHen you are part of the change (shifting your own role within or among institutions), how can you hit the ground running in your new role while helping your new colleagues adapt?

In this session, attendees will learn strategies from veteran student affairs professionals on how to thrive through transition, while still being successful in their roles.

Presenters

  • Ellen Cosgrove, Yale Law School, Associate Dean
  • Beth Pierport, West Virginia University College of Law, Assistant Dean for Enrollment Management

 

VIIIB - Week one: A revised approach to new student orientation

Friday, June 19, 2020 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

Over the course of two years, the Student Life and Academic Achievement departments at UIC John Marshall Law School worked together to revamp new student orientation with an eye toward professionalism and bar passage.  Our orientation is now presented as a three-part program that includes pre-arrival, in-person, and extended orientation sessions.  This presentation will explore our use of technology to provide just-in-time, reviewable presentations; our move from "talking heads" to experiential learning; our focus on non-cognitive factors and lifelong wellness; collaboration between departments; and the early attention given to academic and professional readiness.  Attendees are encouraged to bring their orientation best practices and conundrums for addtional discussion!

Presenter

  • Jennifer Pope, UIC John Marshall Law School, Assistant Dean for Student Life and Leadership
  • Clarence Glenn, UIC John Marshall Law School, Director, Student Activities & Leadership Development

 

VIIIC - In the grey: addressing inappropriate behavior or unprofessional conduct

Friday, June 19, 2020 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

We want to explore approaches to determining honor code violations and what schools consider honor code or behavior policy violations.  How do schools prevent these violations and create professional development programming for current law students.

The program will lead to approaches of preventing honor code violations, communicating policies, and assessing professional development programs for law students.

Presenters

  • Loni Burnette, Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law, Senior Director of Academic Services & Student Life
  • Jessica Fonseca-Nader, St. Thomas University School of Law, Assistant Dean for Enrollment & Scholarships
  • John Hernandez, St. Thomas University School of Law, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
  • Marcia Sells, Harvard Law School, Associate Dean & Dean of Students
  • Alex Sklut, University of Richmond School of Law, Associate Dean of Students.