Schedule

Third Annual NALSAP Conference

June 12-14, 2019 in Washington, D.C.

The Third Annual National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals Conference will be held at American University Washington College of Law in Washington, D.C., from June 12-14, 2019.

 

 

Conference Schedule

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Time

Description

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Mental Health First Aid Add-On (separate registration required)

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Early Conference Check-In and Networking Reception at Chef Geoff's, 3201 New Mexico Ave, Washington DC, 20016

 

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Time

Description

8:00 – 9:00 am

Conference Check-In and Networking

9:00 – 10:00 am

Welcome and Keynote by Robert Carlson, ABA President

10:00 – 10:15 am

Break

10:15 – 11:30 am

Plenary Session I

11:30 am – 1:30 pm

Vendor Fair

11:45 am – 12:45 pm

Lunch

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Concurrent Session I

2:00 – 2:30 pm

Networking Break

2:30 – 3:30 pm

Concurrent Session II

3:30 – 3:45 pm

Break

3:45 – 5:00 pm

Plenary Session II

5:00 – 6:00 pm

Welcome Reception

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Dine Around Town

 

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Time

Description

7:00 – 7:45 am

Walk/Run

8:30 – 8:50 am

Guided Meditation

9:00 – 10:15 am

Plenary Session III

10:15 – 10:30 am

Break

10:30 – 11:45 am

Concurrent Session III

11:30 am – 1:30 pm

Vendor Fair

11:45 am – 1:15 pm

Lunch

12:45 – 1:15 pm

Business Meeting (during lunch)

1:15 – 1:30 pm

Break

1:30 – 2:45 pm

Concurrent Session IV

2:45 – 3:15 pm

Networking Break

3:15 – 4:15 pm

Concurrent Session V

4:15 – 4:30 pm

Break

4:30 – 5:30 pm

Community Activity

 

Friday, June 14, 2019

Time

Description

6:30 7:15 am

Walk/Run

8:45 – 9:45 am

Breakfast and Roundtable Discussion Topics/Dean of Students Meeting

10:00 – 11:00 am

Concurrent Session VI

11:00 – 11:15 am

Break

11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Plenary Session IV

12:30 – 1:45 pm

Networking Lunch and Closing Remarks

 

This schedule is current as of February 1, 2019, but may change as the conference approaches. 

 

Session Descriptions

 

Plenary Session I

Braving Difficult Conversations with Candor, Care, and Curiosity

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 10:15 – 11:30 am

Giving and receiving feedback can be tricky. Often times, people avoid certain discussions that feel important but challenging. Many of us don't have the stamina for difficult conversations, and yet they can be so critical to cultivating a healthy, thriving organization. We will discuss strategies for approaching these conversations, both as the initiator and the person being addressed. Our objective is to develop a mindset and adopt strategies that will help you feel more confident about investing in the challenging conversations that will advance your team's goals.

Presenters

  • Chris Esparza, University of Oregon School of Law, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Leadership Development
  • Jennifer Espinola, University of Oregon School of Law, Law Dean of Students

 

Plenary Session II

A Roadmap to Well-Being

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 3:45 – 5:00 pm

How can you gauge the wellness pulse of your campus?
How can staff and faculty recognize students in distress?
How can you create a culture of wellness?
What low-to-no cost programming can have the most impact?
Join us to hear how five schools found creative ways to navigate student wellness on a budget and walk away with an action-plan to take back to your school.

Presenters

  • Jennifer DiSanza, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Services
  • Jennifer Pope, The John Marshall Law School, Assistant Dean for Student Life and Leadership
  • Jill Klees, Santa Clara University School of Law, Director, Law Student Life
  • Macey Lynd Edmondson, University of Mississippi School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Rebekah Grodsky, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, Director, Academic and Student Affairs

 

Plenary Session III

Bringing Your Identity to the Workplace

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 9:00 – 10:15 am

Many students struggle with being their true authentic selves in the law school setting and as they search for a job. Frequently, students can struggle with internal and external pressures to assimilate or code-switch. Frequently, the legal profession expects conformity. That can be a challenge for those who may not fit "the mold." This session will focus on the indicators that not only make us who we are, but can also have certain societal stigmas attached to them, especially in the workplace. Participants will interactively explore the topics of (1) tattoos/piercings, (2) hair, (3) religious identifiers, and (4) names and how they affect law students' thoughts on entering the workforce - from submitting a resume to making a first impression at an interview. Should I keep my nose piercing in? Should I worry about my yarmulke or my hijab? What about a cross or a crucifix? Should I wear my hair in its natural state or should I change it? Should I hide or mask my identity on my resume? At times, these can be difficult questions to answer. While there are unlikely to be any one-size-fits-all answers to these questions, this session seeks to help attendees think about how to address these issues with students.

Presenters

  • Darren Nealy, The Ohio State University | Michael E. Moritz College of Law, Dean of Students
  • Stephanie Hanna, The Other 85, Founder

 

Plenary Session IV

73 Hours: What One Law School Learned from Taking AN Untraditional Approach with Their 1L Class

Friday, June 14, 2019 | 11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Late August through mid-October are notoriously busy times for Student Affairs professionals. However, when it comes to welcoming 1Ls to campus, this period is critical for retention and wellness purposes. This fall the Student Affairs team at UConn School of Law decided to implement a new policy requiring each 1L to have a 15-minute meeting with the Assistant Dean of Students and a 15 minute meeting with the Campus Mental health Counselor. Seventy-three hours of staff time later, this has proven to be one of the best practices the department has ever pushed out and has led to increased collaboration with staff and faculty, while developing a unique bond with our newest class.
 
In this presentation the Assistant Dean of Students and Mental health Counselor will share the background for the decision, including the statistical data used to justify the time spent on the project, as well as stats and data collected in the academic year that followed. Attendees will hear first-hand from students (via a short video presentation) how these meetings impacted their transition into our campus community, as well as from colleagues that benefited from the decision. The presentation will include an interactive component to demonstrate how we made the most of the 15-minute sessions and why this format served to develop a greater trust between our Student Affairs team and our 1L class. Finally, presenters will discuss boundaries on how the data collected from these meetings has been both protected and shared, and concerns affecting both.

Presenters

  • Jennifer Cerny, University of Connecticut School of Law, Assistant Dean of Students
  • Yvonne Tafuto, University of Connecticut School of Law, Law School Mental Health Counselor

 

Concurrent Session I

IA - A Crash Course in Personal Finance and Student Loans for the Law School Administrator

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 1:00 – 2:00 pm

As law school student affairs professionals, we are responsible for helping students with a broadening range of issues. More and more we are being asked by students to provide guidance with personalized and sometimes difficult financial and job-related decisions. While some law schools have their own financial aid offices or in-house specialists to assist with these types of questions, we recognize that many law schools do not have these resources in-house. As such, questions about financial advice and planning often fall upon those of us working in student affairs. The first part of this three-part session will provide the law school student affairs professional with an understanding of the core concepts of personal financial planning for his/her personal benefit and so he/she can help students navigate, in some cases for the first time, the world of personal finance. The second part of this session will discuss some of the ways that financial hardships can affect student performance both inside and outside of the classroom, and what you can do to help these students. Finally, we will discuss options and resources for current students taking out student loans, as well as options and resources for recent graduates who are entering loan repayment and looking for jobs.

Presenters

  • Emily Horowitz, Director of Experiential Learning and Public Service Programs, University of Colorado Law School
  • Lyssa Thaden, AccessLex Center for Legal Education Excellence, Managing Director, Center for Education and Financial Capability

 

IB - Counseling the Silent Majority: Guiding students with accommodations successfully through Law School & Beyond

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 1:00 – 2:00 pm

The number of law students requiring testing and learning accommodations is growing at a steady, if not alarming, rate. This hidden population of students grappling with anxiety, depression, learning disorders and other mental health diagnoses have special needs that, if left unchecked, directly impact their experience in law school and beyond. The stigma surrounding the underlying factors leading to the need for accommodations, often prevents those who are most in need from seeking out help, thus further impacting and alienating these students. As counselors, what can our role be in assisting students to identify, accept and act upon those special needs? As law school administrators, what can we do from an institutional standpoint to combat the stigma attached to accommodations and protect this vulnerable population? Join us for an interactive session and hear tips from a panel, including a licensed therapist, on how to meet the needs of this silent majority.

Presenters

  • Ellen Schlesinger, Clinical and Career Counselor
  • Leah Terranova, University of Kansas School of Law, Director of Career & Student Counseling Services

 

IC - Modeling Cooperation and Communication: A Joint Approach Between Academic Affairs and Student Services to Addressing Student Needs

Wednesday June 12, 2019 | 1:00 – 2:00 pm

All departments of a law school essentially have the same ultimate goal-to best serve student needs while providing a quality legal education and training students to be productive, ethical, and professional members of the legal profession. Different departments-faculty, student services, the Dean's office, the career and professional development office-all take responsibility for this service and all have different roles in providing services while also providing a legal education. There are times when the cooperation between the Academic Affairs office and the Student Services offices is specifically needed to best solve a problem, and there are occasions in which the preferred routes to problem solving between the two offices may be in conflict. This presentation, by an Associate Dean of Students, who leads the Student Services Office, and an Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, will discuss approaches to ensure cooperation between these offices and ways to resolve conflict regarding student needs. These needs include advising, curriculum design, exam administration, bar preparation, pro bono placement, engaging faculty and students, addressing legal issues such as ADA requirements, orientation and other student centered programming.

Presenters

  • Debra Moss Vollweiler, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law
  • Michele Struffolino, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Associate Dean of Students and Professor of Law

 

Concurrent Session II

IIA - Becoming The Author of One’s Life – Self-Authorship Theory in Law Student Development

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 2:30 – 3:30 pm

Law school represents a period of intense intellectual and personal development in the lives of our students. What is the process through which adult students develop, challenge, and live out their internal belief systems during these transformational years? This question will be explored through the lens of Marcia Baxter Magolda’s research related to the theory of Self-Authorship. Based on the unique longitudinal research studies of Baxter Magolda, Self-Authorship Theory is particularly applicable to the law student experience due to its focus on participants in their 20’s and 30’s and their post undergraduate college development.Session participants will also have the opportunity to engage in a reflective writing activity which invites attendees to explore their own journey of development and the ways in which they have become the authors of their own lives. In Baxter Magolda’s own words, “Higher education has a responsibility to help young adults make the transition from being shaped by society to shaping society in their role as leaders in society’s future.” This statement rings true now more than ever for the next generation of lawyers. The hope is that participants will leave this session with a better understanding of the developmental process law students are experiencing, as well as a reflective token of your own developmental story.

Presenters

  • Colin Watrin, Seattle University School of Law, Associate Director, Admissions & Student Affairs
  • Pam Shea, University of North Dakota School of Law, Assistant Director, Student Life

 

IIB - Crisis Management in the Time of Rumors, Social Media, and Above the Law

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 2:30 – 3:30 pm

In the age of social media, Above the Law, and the law school rumor mill, what do you do when you start to hear about issues of concern, but information is only trickling in? How do you address student concerns, conduct an investigation, communicate with the press, and provide an appropriate and proportional response? Who do you involve in the response team? How do you address the issue with students and with faculty? In this session, we will review an incident that happened this past year, consider multiple response options at each stage of the process as the law school administration learned more, and workshop possible outcomes for when the most you can hope for is making the best of a bad situation.

Presenter

  • Sarah Kelly, St. John’s School of Law, Associate Dean for Administration and Graduate Studies

 

IIC - Do the Right Thing: Ethics and Law Student Affairs

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 | 2:30 – 3:30 pm

Ethical standards have long been developed for undergraduate student affairs professionals. Law student affairs professionals may face similar challenges, but there are particular issues with law school that offer unique scenarios. In this session, we'll explore the ethical obligations of our profession through interactive discussion and an introduction to student affairs ethics and ethics research generally.

Presenter

  • Brandi Welch, The University of Texas at Austin School of Law, Director of Academic Advising and Student Affairs

 

Concurrent Session III

IIIA - Coaching Our Students to Success: Understanding and Utilizing Coaching Techniques

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

Not everyone has the time or resources to become a certified coach. However, law school student affairs professionals “coach” students every day through many different lenses. From academic support and advising, to career counseling, to helping students navigate personal challenges, coaching is a crucial and instrumental component in helping students reach their full potential and take control of their professional development. While many law student affairs professionals have an innate talent for coaching, utilizing more formal coaching techniques that are rooted in neuroscience can strengthen and refine their techniques and in turn help more students effectively navigate their advancement. Session leaders will walk attendees through various coaching models and debunk some of the most common coaching myths. The program will include interactive demonstration of coaching techniques as they arise in various law school settings.

Presenters

  • Katherine "Katie" Crowley, The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Dean of Students
  • Rachael Bosch, Fringe Professional Development, Managing Director

 

IIIB - Engaging Your Core (or your Better, Bottom Half)

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 10:30 – 11:45 am

You know the problem all too well. Your Student services office has well-developed outreach strategies that your top students gravitate towards and utilize. Your top half are taking advantage of the many resources available to them and are genuinely interested in working with you. But, when was the last time you heard from the students who arguably need you the most, your bottom half? Despite the best of intentions, it is difficult to maintain your connection with all students throughout the year, especially when much of the high-profile programming (hello OCIs!) is geared towards your top students. How can your office creatively and effectively partner with faculty, alumni, and employers to provide meaningful support for the students most in need? Whether they’re our students from marginalized populations, our students with academic accommodations, our first generation professionals, or those who just struggle with navigating the landscape of law school, this program will address new ways to identify and engage those at risk students who need you the most. Presenters will share their tips for working with our better-bottom half, but we hope you will also bring ideas to share with the group.

Presenters

  • Angela Cruseturner, Baylor Law, Assistant Dean of Career Development
  • Leah Terranova, University of Kansas School of Law, Director of Career & Student Counseling Services
  • Yolanda Ingram, Penn State Dickinson Law, Assistant Dean for Student Services

 

IIIC - Owning Our Stories: Leveraging Personal and Institutional Narratives to Reduce Microaggressions and Minimize the Effect of Implicit Bias

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 10:30 – 11:45 am 

Ten years ago, UConn Law made national news when racially-charged pictures of its students were posted to social media. The fallout from this divisive event sparked a movement to redefine "diversity" and create comprehensive programming on campus to address the issue head on. The presentation will discuss how we've used our story to create a platform for growth and inclusivity. In addition, this interactive discussion will invite attendees to examine how their institution can go beyond the basics of tolerance and "diversity-for diversity's sake." We invite those present to think about ways their school can transition to a modern and universally-inclusive approach to diversity. By using the Law School's own story as a model for change, participants will earn the importance of ignoring assumptions and listening to the stories of students and colleagues in crafting campus diversity initiatives. In addition, the conversation will touch on ways administrators can expand their institution's disability service framework, and bring in targeted components to better service our diverse populations of individuals in transition, PTSD, veterans, and more through topically-inclusive programming. We intend to allow time for participants to experience the growth-effect of sharing their own narratives and collectively brainstorm ways in which they can be used to effect positive changes at their own institutions. Finally, we will share tips and tricks to: 1. start these difficult conversations in a way that better the institution; 2. address implicit bias issues with close-minded colleagues; and 3. seek external support for funding civility and D&I programming.

Presenters

  • Jennifer Cerny, University of Connecticut School of Law, Assistant Dean of Students
  • Karen DeMeola, University of Connecticut School of Law, Assistant Dean for Finance and Enrollment

 

Concurrent Session IV

IVA - Developing a ToolBox to Address Current Accommodations Issues

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 1:30 – 2:45 pm

One of the more complex and challenging issues faced by student affairs professionals involves the evaluation of law student requests for accommodations. This session will begin with a panel discussion of several examples of the most complex requests for accommodations and how such requests have been addressed by their law schools. During the second part of the session, the attendees will work in groups to draft sample accommodations policies to address some of these complex requests. Each group will be assigned a request for accommodation and will work together with the goal of drafting an accommodations policy or provision for evaluating such request. By the end of the session, the panelists and attendees will develop a toolbox of policies for possible recommendation and implementation at their law schools.

Presenters

  • Emily Scivoletto, UCLA Law, Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs
  • Lisa Ferreira, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Rosemary Queenan, Albany Law School, Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Professor of Law

 

IVB - Raising the Bar: The Role of Law Student Well-Being in Passing the Bar Exam

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 1:30 – 2:45 pm

With recent dips in bar passage statistics, the bar exam has become an issue of even greater concern than ever before to law schools nationwide, and an even greater source of stress for our law students. The exam has always been and will remain of the utmost importance to law students as it represents, literally, the bar between their graduation and their ability to earn a living as a practicing lawyer.Success on the bar exam and in law school is also deeply affected by the health and wellness of our students. Bar exam success and the licensing process begins on (or before) Day 1 of law school, and student success on the progression from 1L to 3L year is affected by myriad issues from substantive knowledge of core doctrinal subjects to skills development, time management, and disciplined engagement with practice testing. This panel will help audience participants recognize key trigger areas where wellness plays a substantial role in student success including but not limited to identifying and providing help for students who are self-medicating, refusing to seek counseling (in some instances stemming from fear of character & fitness reporting requirements), and simply not taking care of themselves (insufficient exercise and/or sleep). Panelists will frame key issues for further study and suggest the sorts of data that law schools should be collecting to enhance our collective knowledge about effective intervention.

Presenters

  • Janet Stearns, University of Miami School of Law, Dean of Students
  • Sara Berman, AccessLex Center for Legal Education Excellence, Director of Programs for Academic and Bar Success
  • Joni Wiredu, American University Washington College of Law, Director, Office of Academic Excellence

 

IVC - Using Strengths to Foster Grit & Growth Mindset in Your Students

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 1:30 – 2:45 pm

In today’s world, “thinking like a lawyer” is not enough for our students to thrive in the profession. To truly succeed, lawyers must develop a whole host of professional skills that allow them to help clients achieve solutions to complex, difficult problems. In short, our students must learn how to lead. A key part of anyone’s leadership journey is developing an in-depth understanding of his/her strengths. Those who consciously learn and develop their strengths alongside the law are better able to showcase practice-ready skills. Law schools foster their students’ holistic development into lawyers who lead only when their students have a foundation based in what they do best, how they most naturally work and are motivated, and how all of it affects their ability to work with others. This session will explore using strengths-based leadership development theory, specifically Gallup’s Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment, to help develop growth mindset and resilience with your student body. Implementing this theory with these tools, law schools can prepare the next generation of lawyers as leaders: improving the profession and society based on their own strengths.

Presenters

  • Molly Brummond, University of Nebraska College of Law, Assistant Dean of External Relations and Strategic Initiatives
  • Tina Jernigan, West Virginia University College of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Life

 

Concurrent Session V

VA - Cutting Through the Clutter - Tools for Organizing and Completing Your Workload

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

Do you have too many things to do and not enough time to do them? Is your desk covered in papers, binders, or to do lists? Does your email inbox look even worse? Do you re-write the same tasks on your to-do list every morning? You're not alone, my friends. As administrators, we are being asked to do more with less and we often find ourselves overwhelmed and wondering how to make sense of all the clutter. Don't despair! I have found some ideas that have helped me and might help you, too!
 
During my presentation, I hope to introduce you to several techniques I've employed to help me organize my workload, keep me on task and help me be more productive. I'll spend some time introducing you to Timeblocking, The Rule of Three, Second Desktop, Inbox Sorting, Kanban Boards, Project Management Tools, and more. I will then show you how I use these tools to organize my work and improve my productivity. Let's get to it!

Presenter

  • Brian Hansen, UCLA Law, Director of Records and Faculty Services

 

VB - Fostering First Gen Success from Admissions to Alumni

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

This session will explore ways law school student affairs professionals can help maximize the academic, professional, and personal success of students who are the first in their families to earn a college or professional degree. We will examine how to best access, advice, and support First Gen students, leverage their strengths, and prepare them for anticipated obstacles. Supporting first-generation students begins before they enroll. The admissions process for law school can be daunting, and sometimes First Gen students need to be approached a little differently and given information to make an informed decision. Similarly, their law school experience in and out of the classroom can be extra challenging due to academic, financial, familial, and other pressures. This interactive discussion will identify hurdles commonly faced by First Gen students and offer inclusive practices and programming strategies to facilitate their ability to acclimate to and succeed in law school as well as to celebrate the diverse experiences and strengths they bring to our learning communities. Similarities and differences between First Gen and iGen – the latest generation to hit law schools – also will be highlighted. Thoughtful engagement from admissions through graduation allows First Gen students to thrive rather than merely survive law school. This session will deepen your understanding about how best to support First Gen students as well as provide tools and concrete ideas to take away, including opportunities for collaboration with other departments and leveraging campus resources.

Presenters

  • Macey Lynd Edmondson, The University of Mississippi School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Melissa Berry, University of Washington School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services

 

VC - Wellness Toolbox: Activities to Use with Your Students Now

Thursday, June 13, 2019 | 3:15 – 4:15 pm

We are all concerned about wellness in our students. But what to do about it? This session will introduce a number of activities that you can use either together or spread out throughout the semester to create wellness awareness amongst your students. We will talk about values driven education, meditation, personality styles, lawyer happiness, grit, strengths, and accessing resources.

Presenters

  • Brandi Welch, The University of Texas at Austin School of Law, Director of Academic Advising and Student Affairs
  • Elizabeth Bangs, The University of Texas at Austin School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

 

Concurrent Session VI

VIA - ASP and Student Affairs Overlap - Effective Techniques for Collaboration

Friday, June 14, 2019 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

Law schools are under increasing scrutiny –many facing lower enrollments, dips in bar passage, and financial struggles. Leading a law school is challenging. The average deanship used to be 7 years; it is now down to 2-3 years. Most law schools now have an “academic support” or “academic success” director in addition to deans of students. Though programs vary greatly, the main goals of academic support (“ASP”) programs are to help students excel in law school and to pass the bar exam. This role touches on myriad issues including teaching fundamental law school learning and study skills, teaching and/or reviewing doctrine, counseling students who have academic and/or personal challenges, and helping prepare students for bar passage. ASP staff address student challenges including test anxiety, depression, imposter syndrome, along with weak critical reading and writing skills and poor time management. Student affairs deans lead in establishing the environment in which law students thrive in law schools; they are responsible for enforcing policies and rules that affect students –from admissions, transfers, dismissals, and re-admission, to nearly everything that touches on student academic, financial, and personal well-being. Many ASP and Student Affairs challenges overlap. Both roles are student-centered, and both leaders often help many of the same students. The focus of this panel will be on making explicit where these two departments overlap and where they diverge. The panel will also explore ways for ASP and Student Services to effectively communicate, collaborate, and best serve students with minimal duplication of (often scarce) resources.

Presenters

  • Camesha Little, Gonzaga University School of Law, Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Academic Support and Bar Programming
  • Hollis Kulwin, University of California, Davis, School of Law, Senior Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Jennifer Carr, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Sara Berman, AccessLex Center for Legal Education Excellence, Director of Programs for Academic and Bar Success
  • Staci Rucker, University of Cincinnati College of Law, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, Student Affairs and Diversity
  • Michele Struffolino, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law, Associate Dean of Students and Professor of Law

 

VIB - Know Your Value: Negotiating to Get What You Deserve

Friday, June 14, 2019 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

In this seminar, we will explore what to ask for when negotiating for your next student affairs position. Do you accept the initial offer or ask for more? What other benefits should you request, including signing bonus, housing allowance, moving costs, flex time, office budget, staffing, etc.? How do you ask for what you deserve in a way that will get you what you want without making you feel like you are being greedy? All of these topics will be explored. In addition, we hope to put together a survey that will be sent out to the NALSAP listserv that will gather information on salaries, benefits, and similar information to give NALSAP members a sense of where they are in relationship to their peers when it comes to compensation , taking into account various factors (private v. public school, years of experience, JD v. non-JD, and the like.

Presenter

  • Shannon Bartlett, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Associate Dean, Inclusion & Engagement
  • Susan Spies Roth, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Associate Dean and Dean of Students
  • Troy Riddle, Albany Law School, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion

 

VIC - Thriving, Not Just Surviving: Building the Bridge from Admissions to Law Practice for Students from Racial, National and Socio-Economic Backgrounds Underrepresented in the Legal Profession

Friday, June 14, 2019 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

Law schools are increasingly admitting students from diverse racial, national and socio-economic backgrounds, but, are not always providing the support these students need to thrive. They arrive with burdens and responsibilities not shared by many of their classmates that often can interfere with their ability to engage in the classroom, participate fully in co-curricular opportunities and maintain wellbeing. These burdens and responsibilities are complex and include financial insecurity, imposter syndrome, stereotype threat and much more. These students possess unique talents, experience, discipline and drive to be tomorrow’s lawyer-leaders. More must be done ensure this cohort has the mentoring, resources and academic and personal support to reach their full potential in law school and in the profession. Participants will learn best practices for implementing programming and support for students from underrepresented backgrounds. The presentation will also cover partnering with Admissions, Alumni Affairs, Faculty and Senior Staff to create programming and resources that are particularly tailored to this cohort of students.

Presenters

  • Maura DeMouy, Georgetown Law, Co-Director RISE Initiative, Director of Academic Success
  • Mitchell Bailin, Georgetown Law, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
  • Nicole Sandoz, Georgetown Law, Co-Director RISE Initiative, Director of Student Life