2018 NALSAP Conference

Registration Information

Thank you for your interest in attending the 2018 NALSAP Conference! Please do the following to ensure your registration and travel plans are complete:

  1. Register for the conference. (Registration is now closed)
  2. Pay your conference registration fee. (Registration is now closed)
  3. Make your travel arrangements.

 

Hotel and Travel Information 

Hotels

Have you made your hotel reservation for the NALSAP Second Annual Conference in Indianapolis? While the NALSAP room block at Springhill Suites is now full, below is a list of hotel options that are within walking distance of IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

  • Courtyard Indianapolis Downtown
  • Fairfield Inn & Suites Indianapolis Downtown
  • JW Marriott Indianapolis
  • Marriott Indianapolis Downtown
  • The Westin Indianapolis
  • SpringHill Suites Indianapolis Downtown

 

Travel Information

Indianapolis is accessible via plane, train, bus and car.  For those planning to fly, the closest airport is the Indianapolis International Airport (IND).  The airport is located about 25 minutes from downtown Indianapolis. Hotel block now full The conference hotel block will be at SpringHill Suites Downtown Indianapolis.  The hotel is less than a ten minute walk from IU McKinney School of Law, steps away from White River State Park and the Indianapolis Zoo.  NALSAP has secured a block of rooms at a discounted rate of $169 (+tax) per night.  To take advantage of the special conference rate, rooms can be reserved by calling (866) 704-6116 or using the following online link: NALSAP Conference Hotel Reservations.

Be sure to use the following Group Code for the NALSAP rate:  

  • NALNALA King $169.00
  • NALNALB Queen/Queen $169.00

 

Vendor Fair and Sponsors

NALSAP thanks its sponsors and vendors!

Vendor Fair

  • Thursday, June 28 and Friday, June 29
  • 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
  • Atrium

Plan to take advantage of opportunities to learn more about the companies and organizations exhibiting and what they have to offer.  Be sure to meet the representatives and participate in the drawing where you could walk away with a $50 Visa gift card! 

Participants include:

  • Access Lex Institute
  • Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE)
  • LSAC
  • Kaplan
  • Themis
  • The Defamation Experience
  • Oohlala

 

Sponsors

NALSAP is grateful for the many sponsors who are supporting our conference:

  • NALSAP Host
    •  Indiana University, McKinney School of Law  
  • NALSAP Partner
    • Law School Admission Council
  • NALSAP Charter Members
    •  Themis Bar Review
    • Kaplan Bar Review
  • NALSAP Advocates
    •  Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE)
    • AccessLex Institute
    • The Defamation Experience
    • Oohlala

 

Conference Schedule

We are excited to welcome you to Indianapolis, Indiana and to Indiana University, Robert H. McKinney School of Law!

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Early Check-in and Reception, Palomino, 49 West Maryland Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

Thursday, June 28, 2018

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Check-in and Networking (coffee and tea provided), Atrium

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Welcome and Keynote Address, Wynne Courtroom

  • Johnny Pryor, NALSAP President & Conference Host
  • Andrew Klein, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law Dean and Paul E. Beam Professor of Law
  • Macey Edmondson, NALSAP Secretary & Conference Program Chair
  • Opening Keynote: Why Law Student Affairs Matters to Inclusive Legal Education
  • Kellye Testy, President and CEO of Law School Admission Council (LSAC)

10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

Plenary Session I, Wynne Courtroom, National Task Force on Lawyer Wellbeing: Creating a Movement in our Law Schools to Improve Well-Being in the Legal Profession

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 pm.

Vendor Fair, Atrium

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Lunch: Sponsored by Themis, Atrium

1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session I, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session IA: It Begins with Admissions: The Impact of Admission Programs on Student Services (Room 245)

  • Session IB: Do You Know Your Title IX?: Best Practices for Addressing Issues Arising Under Title IX (Room 300)

  • Session IC: Finding Balance Outside of the Classroom: From the Under Involved to Over Involved Student (Room 375)

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Concurrent Session II, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session IIA: Online Orientation and Beyond: Beyond Leveraging Existing Technology to Deliver Content Online (Room 245)

  • Session IIB: Mindfulness in Law Schools: How it Can Help Students (Room 300)

  • Session IIC: Beyond the Academics: Student Support Programming (Room 375)

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Plenary Session II, Wynne Courtroom, Planning a Goal-Driven Orientation

5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

NALSAP Welcome Reception Sponsored by LSAC, Atrium (Includes "Mentoring Match" opportunities)

 

Friday, June 29, 2018

7:15 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.

Walk/Run Around the Canal, Led by Macey Edmondson (Meet in SpringHill Suites Lobby)

8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Guided Morning Meditation, Led by Rebekah Grodsky, Room 245

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

Plenary Session III, Wynne Courtroom, At the Corner of Privilege and Oppression: Strategies for Advising Students at the Intersection of Multiple Identities

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session III, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session IIIA: Unexpected Tragedies: From the Death of Students to the Boston Marathon Bombing, How Student Affairs Professionals Manage a Crisis on Several Fronts (Room 375)

  • Session IIIB: The ABA and the ADA: How Law School Learning Outcomes Can Form the Basis for Assessing Reasonable Accommodation Requests (Room 300)

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Vendor Fair, Atrium

11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Lunch sponsored by Kaplan Bar Review, Atrium

1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

NALSAP Business Meeting, Wynne Courtroom

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Concurrent Session IV, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session IVA: Learning from Bar Examiners: Strategies for Passing the Character and Fitness Standard for Bar Admission (Room 245)

  • Session IVB: Leadership Under Construction (Room 300)

  • Session IVC: Assessing Our Work and Informing the Future: An Introduction to AccessLex Institute’s Diversity Pipeline Grand and Bar Success Grant Programs (Room 375)

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Concurrent Session V, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session VA: Self- Care for Student Services Professionals (Room 245)

  • Session VB: Best Practices in Implementation of Reasonable Accommodations in Times of Increased Demand for and Increased Complexity of Accommodations for Students with Disabilities (Room 300)

  • Session VC: Gaining Grit: Helping Law Students Building Resilience (Room 375)

5:00 p.m.

Pre-Show Reception Sponsored by the Defamation Experience, Atrium

5:30 p.m.

The Defamation Experience, A Play by Todd Logan, Wynne Courtroom

7:00 p.m.

Dinner on Your Own

 

Saturday, June 30, 3018

6:30 a.m. to 7:15 a.m.

Walk/Run Around the Canal, Led by Macey Edmondson (Meet in SpringHill Suites Lobby)

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Concurrent Meetings:

  • Meeting #1: Deans of Students, Room 300

  • Meeting #2: New Professionals, Room 375

9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

Concurrent Session VI, Various Classrooms (see below)

  • Session VIA: Please Don’t Make Me Manage! Creating Sustainable Working Relationships with Employees, Colleagues, Faculty and Bosses (Room 245)

  • Session VIB: Striking a Balance: Free Expression and Diversity & Inclusion (Room 300)

  • Session VIC: Mediation 101: How and Why Law School Student Affairs Professionals Should Cultivate a Personal Meditation Practice (Room 375)

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.

Closing Plenary Session and NALSAP Traditions, Wynne Courtroom, Where's Help When You Need It?: Legal Issues in Law School Student Affairs

12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Networking Lunch, Atrium

 

Plenary Sessions

The following plenary sessions will be held on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Plenary sessions are designated by the NALSAP Conference Committee as sessions that all NALSAP Conference participants should attend. They involve a broad range of topics designed to enhance professional knowledge and skills.

National Task Force on Lawyer Wellbeing: Creating a Movement in our Law Schools to Improve Well-Being in the Legal Profession

  • Terry Harrell, Indiana Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program
  • David Jaffee, American University School of Law
  • Janet Stearns, University of Miami School of Law

In August, 2017, the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being published The Path to Lawyer Well-Being: Practical Recommendations for Positive Change. The new and comprehensive report is a powerful call to action in response to high incidence of law student and lawyer substance use and mental health concerns. This Task Force report includes some very specific recommendations for law schools as well as the regulators, bar associations and other stakeholders. Our role in addressing substance use and mental health concerns in law schools is more important than ever in preparing our graduates for the practice of law. This panel will provide an overview of the Task Force report and highlight concrete activities and programming for student services professionals, including Mental Health Day, online resources, and other curricular and co-curricular strategies. We will also highlight the resources available from bar association and lawyers assistance professionals in our communities to help us with these critical initiatives.

Thursday, June 28th from 10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., Wynne Courtroom

 

Planning a Goal Driven Orientation

  • Mitchell Balin, Georgetown University Law Center

We've all experienced the common pitfalls in planning law school orientation. It’s easy to fall into the traps of doing the same programs year after year, parading out a series of talking heads who share information that’s either out of context before classes start or that the students will quickly forget, giving in to “special interest” offices or faculty who want a platform, spending precious funding on low impact events, failing to use orientation as a key platform to teach and model critical professional competencies, or neglecting the opportunity to make essential first impressions of the school and the profession. The goal of this panel is to share some best practices to apply strategic planning techniques to law school orientation. Using the evolution of the Georgetown Law JD orientation week as a test case, the panelists will share (1) their process for goal identification and prioritization in developing orientation week programming; (2) their current highest priority goals for orientation week, and how those have evolved over 15 years; (3) the programs they have implemented and discarded in recent years to fulfill those goals; (4) best practices for engaging partners across and outside the law school to refine the goals and enhance the programs; (5) ways to align spending priorities and key goals, including strategies to deploy student, staff and alumni resources to deliver programming; and (6) approaches to iteratively evaluate orientation programming based on key metrics. The program will include opportunities for large group Q & A and brainstorming in small groups if time permits.

Thursday, June 28th from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wynne Courtroom

 

At the Corner of Privilege and Oppression: Strategies for Advising Students at the Intersection of Multiple Identities

  • Jino Ray, Howard University School of Law
  • Troy Riddle, John Marshall Law School

Each of us exists at the intersection of multiple identities. Some identities afford us privileges, while others marginalize. In the context of law school, students arrive with varying levels of understanding and comfort as it relates to their identity. Many often struggle to fully communicate their intersecting identities and articulate how their identities might impact their ability to navigate the demands of law school. As student affairs professionals, how do we advise students who are becoming increasingly more aware of their identities - particularly those who are marginalized as a result of them. This interactive session will examine the challenges of advising students across multiple identities. Participants will consider points of intersection in their own identities and work to pinpoint areas where, as a result of those identities, they may be vulnerable to exhibiting bias in their role as an advisor. From there, participants will grapple with realistic advising scenarios and explore answers to questions such as: Where are the intersections of identity? How would I empower this student through our interactions? What questions would I ask (or NOT ask)? If I feel ill-equipped to assist a student, where or to whom would/should I refer the student?

Friday, June 29th from 9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m., Wynne Courtroom

 

Where’s Help When You Need it?: Legal Issues in Law School Student Affairs

  • Kristen Meeks, National Association of College and University Attorneys
  • James Nussbaum, Indiana University
  • Larry D. Robertson, Valparaiso University

This session will provide a legal update on several issues of significance to law student affairs professionals and may cover a number of topics such as: ADA requirements, student organizations and risk management, free speech, and Title IX enforcement and compliance. Panelists will be include members of the National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA), James Nussbaum, assistant general counsel for Indiana University and Larry Robertson, Assistant General Counsel and Title IX Coordinator for Valparaiso University. NACUA, the premier organization in the field of higher education law, aims to enhance legal assistance to colleges and universities by educating attorneys and administrators as to the nature of campus legal issues. Panelists will discuss strategies to develop and implement policies, how to work proactively to avoid legal issues, and share ways to cultivate relationships with your campus Office of General Counsel. This session will also provide an opportunity to engage in discussion of case studies and best practices. Kristen Meeks, Assistant Director of Legal Resources for NACUA will moderate this session.

Saturday, June 30th from 10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Wynne Courtroom

 

Concurrent Sessions

Thursday, June 28th

Sessions are listed in chronological order.

It Begins with Admissions: The Impact of Admission Programs on Student Services

  • Kent Lollis, Law School Admission Council
  • Sondra Tennessee, University of Houston School of Law

Organizations that are known for outstanding service to their constituents often design and practice what is known as an end-to-end service strategy. In the law school context, this would mean aligning service to students that begins in the admission process and flows smoothly on into the alumni ranks. In this session, we will explore how outstanding student service starts with admission and offer ideas and an opportunity for dialogue on this promising model for legal education.

Thursday, June 28th at 1:00 to 2:15 p.m., Room 245

 

Do You Know Your Title IX?: Best Practices for Addressing Issues Arising Under Title IX

  • Maura DeMouy, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Markeisha Miner, Cornell University School of Law
  • Nicole Sandoz, Georgetown University Law Center

In the wake of Betsy DeVos’ rescinding of Obama-era Title IX guidance and the media blitz around sexual harassment and assault in the entertainment industry, sexual misconduct is yet again a hot topic of debate. Most student affairs professionals are on the front line every day. Whether helping a victim of sexual violence, mediating a dispute over comments made in class, or supporting a student triggered by comments in class, we are often the first point of contact. Law schools are unique environments that produce situations requiring complex and collaborative solutions. Participants will learn best practices for implementing support and interim measures for law school students through case studies, including academic assistance, no contact orders, housing accommodations, and safety planning. The presentation will also cover partnering between student services, confidential counselors, Title IX officers, and public safety to ensure each student receives comprehensive support.

Thursday, June 28th at 1:00 to 2:15 p.m., Room 300

 

Finding Balance Outside of the Classroom: From the Under Involved to Over Involved Student

  • Pam Shea, University of North Dakota School of Law
  • Colin Watrin, Seattle University School of Law

Law School is a busy time for our students, both in and out of the classroom. Expectations for involvement have increased for students as they all compete for top grades, coveted leadership positions, internships, and post-graduation jobs. Our student body today is also very different than 10 years ago in their expectations from schools in terms of involvement opportunities. Is your law school keeping up with the times? Through an interactive presentation, session participants will learn about helping our students find appropriate levels of involvement outside the classroom, building connections, and making meaning of their experiences. This session will draw upon student development theory related to involvement and how students continue to build both their personal and professional identity during law school. This session also address how we can do all this while resources in higher education are tightening. From the classically over involved student who should probably be spending more time studying, to those who fly under the radar and could benefit from larger connections, involvement without intentionality can be limiting to our already busy students. Join us as we discuss how student affairs staff can help.

Thursday, June 28th at 1:00 to 2:15 p.m., Room 375

 

Online Orientation and Beyond: Leveraging Existing Technology to Deliver Content Online

  • Jill A. Collins, Boston University School of Law

We are all tasked with providing important information to our students, who are increasingly demanding convenient delivery of this information. Simultaneously, we are dealing with limited resources, not the least of which is time. In this session, we’ll cover how we took part of our orientation online, freeing up time for meaningful in-person interaction at Orientation and improving accountability for the material. We’ll cover how you can use your school’s learning management system (like Blackboard) to deliver content (and accountability) to students throughout their three years. Finally, audience members will have time to brainstorm ways to apply this to their school, and to share those ideas and common challenges with other participants.

Thursday, June 28th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 245

 

Mindfulness in Law Schools: How it Can Help Students

  • Lydia Johnson, Thurgood Marshall School of Law
  • Elaina Marino, 3L, Syracuse University School of Law
  • Richard C. Reuben, University of Missouri School of Law

This panel will introduce the audience to mindfulness meditation, and demonstrate how it can help interested law students manage stress and implicit biases, and be happier and more effective law students and lawyers. Participants will learn what mindfulness practice is, hear about the first empirical study of the efficacy of mindfulness meditation training for law students, find out different ways to introduce mindfulness into law schools, get a law student’s perspective on its potential contribution to law student well-being, and learn how such law school initiatives connect with the larger mindfulness in law movement.

Thursday, June 28th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 300

 

Beyond the Academics: Student Support Programming

  • Elizabeth (Ferrufino) Bodamer, Indiana Maurer School of Law

Student affairs is about focusing on students holistically to ensure academic and professional success. Yosso’s model of community cultural wealth is an example of a model that can be used to support the “whole student,” especially marginalized students. Yosso argues that all forms of capital, aspirational, linguistic, familial, social, navigational, and resistance. can be used to empower students. This presentation will outline how Yosso’s model can translate into student support programming in law school. Through a brief presentation and a group discussion, participants will have an opportunity to talk through different programming and to exchange ideas they can take back to their schools.

Thursday, June 28th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 375

 

Friday, June 29th

Unexpected Tragedies: From the Death of Students to the Boston Marathon Bombing, How Student Affairs Professionals Manage a Crisis on Several Fronts

  • Julie Cahill, University of Massachusetts School of Law
  • Laura Ferrari, Suffolk University Law School
  • Ann McGonigle Santos, Suffolk University Law School

Tragedies have affected all of us, whether the death of a student, a natural catastrophe, or a terrorist act. These events not only require us to be adept at crisis management, but to do so while balancing all of the other tasks - and fires we put out - on a daily basis. Not only do these events require us to act quickly, but with sensitivity and accuracy while managing the different school groups and departments that require our input. What policies do these events trigger and how do we manage the different personalities who may have competing interests, such as the family, affected student, Administration, Faculty, etc. Through a presentation & group discussion, participants will learn how to manage the moving parts of a crisis that strikes the entire school community.

Friday, June 29th at 10:30 to 11:45 a.m., Room 375

 

The ABA and the ADA: How Law School Learning Outcomes Can Form the Basis for Assessing Reasonable Accommodation Requests

  • Rosemary Queenan, Albany Law School
  • Emily Scivoletto, UCLA School of Law

ABA Standard 302 requires all law schools to have stated “learning outcomes” for their J.D. program as well as for each course offered. Law schools are also required, under the ADA, and often their own policies, to provide students with reasonable accommodations for recognized disabilities. In this workshop, participants will learn how law school and course specific learning outcomes can form the basis for assessing whether or not an accommodations request impacts an essential performance standard.

Friday, June 29th at 10:30 to 11:45 a.m., Room 300

 

Learning from Bar Examiners: Strategies for Passing the Character and Fitness Standard for Bar Admission

  • Cathleen Sharader, Indiana Board of Law Examiners
  • Bradley Skolnik, Indiana Supreme Court, Admissions & Continuing Education (ACE)
  • Nancy Vincent, Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar

Everyone has a past, including some of our students who apply for admission to the bar. In addition to passing a bar examination, students must possess the requisite good moral character and fitness to practice law, as determined by a state board of law examiners. What are the most challenging cases for board of law examiners? What are the cases that require further review or scrutiny than the typical applicant? If a student has some issues that put their character and fitness to practice law in question, what should Student Affairs professionals advise our students? How can we address student fears about seeking counseling in law school for mental health concerns? How should we assist a student who is required to make an appearance before the Board of Law Examiners? This session may be comprised of representatives from bar examiners in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, and Ohio, as well as a representative from a state Judges Lawyers Assistance Program, will answer these questions and share their expertise in assisting our students. Panelists will also share with board of law examiners and student affairs professionals can work together to support the legal profession.

Friday, June 29th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 245

 

Leadership Under Construction

  • Rebekah Grodsky, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law
  • Emily Scivoletto, UCLA School of Law

Most of us are not leadership experts, yet we hope to teach student-leaders how to build, sustain, manage, and grow their organizations. Many of the students we train will someday lead law practices, chair bar organizations, serve on the boards of non-profit organizations, and run businesses; we need to be offering our students more than the nuts and bolts of how to get an event on calendar and pay for catering. If you want to offer your student leaders more, this session is for you! Participants will be exposed to current practices in transformative leadership training, leadership style assessments, restorative leadership concepts, and conflict resolution training.

Friday, June 29th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 300

 

Assessing Our Work and Informing the Future: An Introduction to AccessLex Institute’s Diversity Pipeline Grand and Bar Success Grant Programs

  • Rachel Patterson, AccessLex Institute
  • Aaron Taylor, AccessLex Institute

AccessLex Institute offers two grant programs that have broad relevance to the work of student affairs professionals. The Diversity Pipeline Grant funds innovative approaches to aiding the matriculation of underrepresented people into law school and the legal profession. The Bar Success Grant funds programs aimed at improving bar exam performance among students most at risk of not passing. In this session, participants will learn how AccessLex Institute’s diversity and bar success grant programs can 1) enhance their understanding of the strengths and challenges of their current efforts and offerings, and 2) inspire them to create innovative program proposals to address these challenges head-on.

Friday, June 29th at 2:30 to 3:45 p.m., Room 375

 

Self-Care for Student Services Professionals

  • Jennifer DiSanza, University of Louisville, Brandeis School of Law
  • Angela Lechleiter, University of Louisville, Brandeis School of Law

We need to set an example for our students when it comes to mental health and wellness. We address mental health, substance abuse, and overall wellness with our student bodies, but are we taking our own advice? Are you new to student services? Have you been in the profession and are starting to feel worn down or ineffectual? Learn to recognize signs and symptoms of self-care issues and how to combat them. Participants will work together to develop tools and resources for our profession.

Friday, June 29th at 4:00 to 5:00 p.m., Room 245

 

Best Practices in Implementation of Reasonable Accommodations in Times of Increased Demand for and Increased Complexity of Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

  • Michael T. McCarthy, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
  • Kathryn J. Pelham, Stetson University College of Law
  • Mya Rimon, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (Canada)
  • Nancy Sperling, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (Canada)

As the number of law students with accommodations increases each year, and the complexity and number of accommodations students receive also grows, those of us who provide student services need to be equipped to address current needs and forecast changes in an ever-evolving area of our work. At this program, presenters will address current trends in accommodating students with disabilities; institutional structures that serve students who receive accommodations; the role of faculty in working with students who receive in-class accommodations; the need to implement accommodations in midterm and alternative assessments and field placements; and the implications of all of this for students as they enter the workplace following graduation. Through a moderated panel presentation and group discussion, participants will share their own challenges and best practices for implementing accommodations and brainstorm ways to improve the delivery of student accommodations in the classroom, in exams, and in practice settings.

Friday, June 29th at 4:00 to 5:00 p.m., Room 300

 

Gaining Grit: Helping Law Students Build Resilience

  • Melissa Berry, University of Washington School of Law
  • Jayne Kacer, Chapman University School of Law

Law student affairs professionals know better than anyone that law students often struggle to bounce back from personal and professional setbacks. Traditionally, it’s been thought that resilience and grit are something you either have or you don’t. Yet resilience theory has recently been recognized as demonstrating the ability of humans to build resilience over time and through experiences; the books Grit by Angela Duckworth and Mindset by Carole Dweck have popularized the theory. This program will introduce the science surrounding resiliency, including grit and growth mindset, and the work of the University of Washington Resilience Lab. Law students can develop the skills underlying resilience through intentional action, reflection, and coaching. By developing these important life skills, students are better positioned to improve their law school performance as well as have a head start as a legal professional.

Friday, June 29th at 4:00 to 5:00 p.m., Room 375

 

Saturday, June 30th

Please Don’t Make Me Manage! Creating Sustainable Working Relationships with Employees, Colleagues, Faculty and Bosses

  • Brian Hansen, UCLA School of Law
  • Emily Scivoletto, UCLA School of Law

We are great with students! But how can we manage up, down and sideways to ensure we are building and sustaining excellent professional relationships? This workshop is for law student affairs professionals interested in how best to support and manage employees, partner with colleagues across departments, and create positive and productive relationships with faculty, bosses and deans. Participants will leave the workshop with sample employee development plans, leadership assessment tools, discussion guides for difficult conversations and a whole new outlook on “management.”

Saturday, June 30th at 9:15 to 10:15 a.m., Room 245

 

Striking a Balance: Free Expression and Diversity & Inclusion

  • Shannon P. Bartlett, University of Chicago School of Law
  • Mark Jefferson, Harvard Law School
  • Susie Spies Roth, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

In recent years, university campuses have very publicly reaffirmed commitments to principles of academic freedom and free expression. Simultaneously, underrepresented students have protested, written demand letters, and engaged in other efforts to challenge campuses’ espoused commitments to diversity, instead arguing that campuses have failed to foster inclusion. As student affairs professionals, we frequently are on the front lines of upholding the institution’s commitment to academic freedom, while supporting diverse student populations. This program will explore the tensions that arise from balancing these two essential principles of higher education and brainstorm solutions and initiatives designed to lessen the tension and promote productive dialogue.

Saturday, June 30th at 9:15 to 10:15 a.m., Room 300

 

Meditation 101: How and Why Law School Student Affairs Professionals Should Cultivate a Personal Meditation Practice

  • Rebekah Grodsky, University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Self-care is vital for student affairs professionals working in the often-stressful law school environment. For thousands of years, people have used meditation to move beyond the mind's stress-inducing thoughts and emotional upsets into the peace and clarity of present moment awareness. Meditation also helps practitioners learn how to find a moment of quiet pause before reaction. This highly experiential session will cover meditation basics, including introducing several specific meditation techniques that you could use as a basis for starting (or expanding) your own personal practice. This session will be suited for everyone, including curious beginners and regular practitioners.

Saturday, June 30th at 9:15 to 10:15 a.m., Room 375

 

Presenter Information

 NALSAP is grateful to the student affairs professionals, law school faculty and other educators and professionals coming from around the country to present at our second annual conference in Indianapolis in June. Thank you!

 

Mitchell Bailin
Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
Georgetown University Law Center

Mitch Bailin is Associate Vice President and Dean of Students at Georgetown Law. Within his portfolio of student affairs responsibilities, he oversees the law school’s Office of Disability Services, which provides accommodations to dozens of Georgetown’s 2,700 law students annually. Before coming to Georgetown in 2004, Mitch practiced higher education law at a large firm in Boston, where he represented colleges and universities in a wide range of matters, including disability discrimination complaints.


Shannon P. Bartlett
Dean of Students
University of Chicago School of Law

Shannon P. Bartlett is the Dean of Students at The University of Chicago Law School. Previously, Shannon served as the Director of Diversity Education & Outreach at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. During her career, Shannon practiced law with the ACLU of Illinois and with the Chicago-based law firms Jenner & Block, LLP and Valorem Law Group. Shannon has had the privilege of working in higher education for Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Chicago. Her primary areas of interest center on the unconscious ways diversity and culture impact our everyday decision-making and interactions, as well as how to effectively balance the goal of inclusion with the development of an intellectually diverse community. Shannon earned her B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, her J.D. summa cum laude from the DePaul University College of Law, and an M.A. in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California, Berkeley.


Melissa Berry
Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services
University of Washington School of Law

Melissa Berry is the Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services at the University of Washington School of Law, where she oversees the department responsible for student organizations, career services, public service, academic advising, and wellness. She currently serves on the AALS Student Services Section’s Executive Committee. Melissa has over twelve years of experience in legal education She was previously the Director of Graduate Program & Alumni Coaching and faculty member at UW Law. She also served as Assistant Dean of Career Services and as an Associate Professor at Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law, and she was a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Missouri School of Law. Before moving into academia, Melissa was an associate attorney at Latham & Watkins in Washington, DC and at Perkins Coie LLP in Seattle. At Perkins, she was a Perkins Coie Community Service Fellow. Following law school, Melissa was a law clerk to a federal district court judge and a federal appellate court judge. Melissa earned her JD from Northwestern University School of Law and her BA from Tulane University.

Elizabeth (Ferrufino) Bodamer
Director of Student Affairs
Indiana Maurer School of Law

Elizabeth (Ferrufino) Bodamer is the Director of Student Affairs at Indiana Maurer School of Law and a 2012 graduate of the school. Currently, she is a sociology PhD candidate at Indiana University Bloomington. Bodamer’s research focuses on race/ethnicity, gender, intersectionality, the legal profession, and legal education. Last year, along with Dean Matthews and Dean Pryor, she presented at NALSAP on “A Law school Mentoring Model: How Student Affairs Professionals Can Use Principles to Support Marginalized Law Students.” Additionally, she presented a paper at the Law and Society Association annual conference on “Questioning the Questioners: Extending Research on the Fates of Recent Law School Graduates,” and she is currently working on a piece for the coming Law and Society Association annual conference that examines job satisfaction of women of color in the legal profession. Her dissertation explores how marginalized law students experience legal education and the impact of their antecedent experiences, including law school climate and their social support systems, on their sense of belonging, performance, career expectations, and overall experience.

Julie Cahill
Director of Student Engagement and Professional Development
University of Massachusetts School of Law

Julie Cahill currently serves as the Director of Student Engagement and Professional Development at University of Massachusetts School of Law, the only public law school in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Julie first joined UMass Law in 2014 and served as the Assistant Director for Legal Career Services. In her current role, she focuses her work on increasing student engagement and creating professional development opportunities for law students. A graduate of Connecticut College and New England School of Law, Julie has more than twenty years’ experience as a practicing lawyer and served as an adjunct faculty member at New England Law Boston.

Jill A. Collins
Director for Student Affairs
Boston University School of Law

Jill A. Collins is the Associate Director for Student Affairs at Boston University School of Law. Jill joined the Student Affairs team at BU Law in fall of 2012, and has spent the last five years developing the Orientation program, coordinating the Student Advisor program, advising student organizations, especially our Student Government Association and Public Interest Project, planning large-scale community events like our 5K race and 3L Farewell Dinner, and responding to a broad array of student concerns. Before returning to higher education, Jill worked in the Individual Clients Department at Day Pitney LLP (formerly Day, Berry & Howard LLP) for about six years, focusing on estate planning, estate administration, trust administration, and tax-exempt law. While at Day Pitney, Jill served as a mentor to summer associates and newer associates, and ran the Boston office summer program in 2008. Jill received her B.A. in political science from Boston College and her JD from the University of Notre Dame Law School. Outside of the law school building, Jill lived and worked in an undergraduate women’s hall as an assistant rector.

Maura DeMouy
Deputy Title IX Coordinator and Director of Academic Success
Georgetown University Law Center

Maura DeMouy serves as Georgetown University Law Center Deputy Title IX Coordinator and Director of Academic Success. She provides educational programs regarding sexual misconduct; responds to and seeks resolution to allegations of sexual misconduct, including all formal Title IX complaints, and coordinates all Title IX requests for pregnancy and parenting-related adjustments. She also directs the Law Center's Academic Success programs, counsels students individually, advises Barristers' Council and develops wellness initiatives. Prior to working at Georgetown, Maura was the Dean of Students at The Catholic University of America's Columbus School of Law. Before CUA Law, at the University of Maryland School of Law, she taught Legal Research and Writing for over eight years and a skills course preparing women for law practice. She also coordinated the LEAD Initiative, which helped students prepare for practice with curriculum and programs focused on leadership development, cultural competency and ethics. Prior to Maryland Law, she was an associate at Hogan & Hartson (now Hogan Lovells).

Jennifer DiSanza
Assistant Dean for Student Services and Law Chief of Staff
University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law

Jennifer DiSanza is currently the Assistant Dean for Student Services and Law Chief of Staff at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law. Prior to joining Brandeis, she served as the Assistant Dean for Student Administration at Capital University Law School in Columbus, OH and the Director of Student Affairs at the University of Maryland School of Law. She received her JD from the University of Maryland, MS from Johns Hopkins University and BS from Miami University in Ohio. In 2013, she served as Chair of the AALS Section of Student Services. Before law school, DiSanza spent several years working in Human Resources and production management. In addition to her work in Student Services, she designs and implements a comprehensive development program for the staff at Brandeis. She also coaches and counsels supervisors on various aspects of management.

Macey Edmondson
Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions & Scholarship
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
University of Mississippi School of Law

Macey Edmondson is currently the Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions & Scholarships, but will be returning to her role in the fall of 2018 as Assistant Dean for Student Affairs at The University of Mississippi School of Law. In her role as Dean of Students, she assists students with disabilities by working with the Student Disabilities Services department and providing adequate support and accommodations. She is the advisor for the Law School Student Body Honor Council and Student Bar Association and oversees student organizations by providing coordination of activities, programming, and communications. Dean Edmondson reviews and implements law school policies in a wide array of areas, including disciplinary actions, academic actions, budgeting, and record-keeping. During her first year as dean of students, she was chosen by the student body as the recipient of the Joan K. Murphy Outstanding Law School Staff Member Memorial Award. She also served as Co-director for the Council for Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) three years in a row. Additionally, she was chosen as Chair of the Executive Board for the Student Services Committee of the Association for American Law Schools and to serve on the Mississippi Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Macey received her J.D. and Ph.D. in Higher Education at the University of Mississippi. She also received a B.S.B.A. in Banking & Finance from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Laura Ferrari
Dean of Students
Suffolk University Law School

Laura Ferrari graduated from Babson College with a B.S. in management. She is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, earning her J.D. from Suffolk University Law School and M.B.A. from Suffolk’s Sawyer Business School. After a short time practicing in the fields of estates and environmental law, Ms. Ferrari returned to Suffolk by becoming the Assistant, and then Associate Director of the University’s learning center where she managed a staff of over 50 student employees in the University’s peer tutoring program. In 2000, she joined the Suffolk University Law School Dean of Students Office where she has served as the Assistant Dean of Students, Acting Dean of Students and since 2006, the Dean of Students. In this role, she counsels individual students and student groups, serves as the advisor to the Student Bar Association, is responsible for numerous student programs including new student orientation, and serves on several law school and university-wide committees, including the University’s incident team. Ms. Ferrari currently serves as the Vice President of the Board of Directors of Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers (LCL), the Massachusetts bar-funded lawyer assistance program.

Rebekah Grodsky
Director of Academic and Student Affairs
University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Rebekah Grodsky is the Director of Academic and Student Affairs at the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law. Among her many roles at McGeorge, Rebekah oversees student organizations and student life, provides academic and personal counseling for students, and works with the academic deans and faculty to ensure academic program excellence and curricular innovation. Rebekah is currently the President-Elect of NALSAP.

Brian Hansen
Director of Records and Faculty Services
UCLA School of Law

Brian Hansen is the Director of Records and Faculty Services at UCLA School of Law. Brian’s primary responsibility is to lead the Records Office and Faculty Support staff through their daily operations. Brian and his two teams strive to implement policies and procedures that provide innovative and efficient services to the law school community. Brian represents his departments on several Law School committees, and the School of Law on multiple UCLA campus planning committees, often utilizing his knack for working with data and his love of Microsoft Excel. Prior to working at UCLA School of Law, Brian spent four years working for William Mitchell College of Law in Saint Paul, Minnesota, where he was selected by his peers to win the 2013 “Behind the Scenes Award of Excellence”. Before starting his career in legal education, Brian also spent seven years in leadership positions with Wells Fargo Bank and Target Corp. in Minnesota. Brian earned his J.D. from William Mitchell College of Law, his M.F.A. from Minnesota State University, Mankato, and both his B.A. in Political Science and his B.F.A. in Creative and Professional Writing from Bemidji State University.

Terry Harrell
Executive Director
Indiana Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program

Terry Harrell, JD, LCSW, MAC, LCAC, is the Executive Director of the Indiana Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program. She is the immediate past Chair of the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs, a member and co-author of the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being Report, and Chair of the ABA Working Group for the Advancement of Lawyer Well-Being. Terry completed her law degree at Maurer School of Law and her Master of Social Work Degree (MSW) and Indiana University. Terry is a licensed clinical addiction counselor (LCAC) in Indiana and has a nationally recognized master addiction counselor certification (MAC) from NAADAC. From 2007 through 2010 Terry served on the Advisory Committee to the American Bar Association’s Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP). She served from 2010 through 2013 as a commissioner on CoLAP. She is past Chair of the Senior Lawyer Assistance Subcommittee and the National Conference Planning Subcommittee for CoLAP. In August 2014 Terry became the first ever LAP Director to be appointed Chair of CoLAP. Terry is also a member of the Indiana State Bar Association (ISBA) and currently serving as the Secretary for the ISBA Board of Governors. She is past Chair of the Professional Legal Education Admission and Development Section (PLEADS) and the Wellness Committee and an active member of the Planning Committee for the Solo Small Firm Conference. In maintaining her own health and well-being Terry finds running, walking, and spending lots of time with her therapy dog, Gus, to be the most important elements.

David Jaffe
Associate Dean for Student Affairs
American University Washington College of Law

David Jaffe is Associate Dean for Student Affairs at American University Washington College of Law. In his work on law student wellness he has served on the D.C. Bar Lawyer Assistance Program and serves as chair of the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP) Law School Assistance Committee. David authored “The Key to Law Student Well-Being? We Have to Love Our Law Students” this month, and a previous article reporting the results of the 2014 Survey of Law Student Well-Being. He was lead author for the Law School section of “The Path to Lawyer Well-Being: Practical Recommendations for Positive Change” released in August. He also produced the “Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy” video that is used as a resource in many Professional Responsibility classes around the country, and is responsible for modernizing the “Substance Abuse & Mental Health Toolkit for Law Students and Those Who Care About Them”. David says he practices self-care by being in the moment with his daughters as often as possible.

Mark Jefferson
Director of Community Engagement and Equity
Harvard Law School

Mark Jefferson is the Director of Community Engagement and Equity at Harvard Law School. Mark counsels students from a wide variety of diverse backgrounds, with a special focus on developing relationships with and working through the concerns of students from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds, whether religious, socioeconomic, racial, gender/sexual identity, political, or any combination thereof. In collaboration with student groups, faculty, various administrative offices, and centers, Mark develops programming that promotes cultural competency, civil discourse, and thick articulations of the unique ways social justice, inclusion, and equity intersect at Harvard Law School and beyond. Additionally, he contributes to the planning and implementation of Dean of Students Office events and programs including Commencement, Orientation, and student leadership development programs. He received his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School, and his B.A. in Philosophy from Morehouse College. In his spare time he reads whatever he can get his hands on, writes fiction, and contemplates the seemingly effortless genius of Sarah Vaughan, among other things.

Lydia D. Johnson
Director, Criminal Defense Clinic
Thurgood Marshall School of Law

Lydia D. Johnson is co-chair of the AALS Balance Section's Mindfulness Affinity Group, a member of the Board of the Mindfulness in Law Society, and Director of the Criminal Defense Clinic at Thurgood Marshall School of Law in Houston, Texas. She teaches mindfulness to students and faculty at her law school, and her goal is to increase awareness of the benefits of mindfulness to law students, especially HBCU law schools.

Jayne Taylor Kacer
Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Chapman University Fowler School of Law

Jayne Taylor Kacer is the Associate Dean of Student Affairs at Chapman University Fowler School of Law. Jayne earned her JD cum laude from Loyola Law School in 1985. After graduating from law school, Jayne became associated with the Orange County-based law firm of Rutan & Tucker, LLP and was made a partner in the firm in 1993. During the course of her career in private practice, Jayne primarily handled large, complex civil litigation matters and civil appeals in both federal and state courts. She began teaching legal research and writing at Chapman's Fowler School of Law in 2001 as an adjunct professor. In 2004, Dean Kacer left practice to accept a full-time position at Fowler School of Law. She was selected by the students as Professor of the Year for 2006-2007. In addition to her teaching and administrative duties, Dean Kacer has served as a faculty member for the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA) on the subject of depositions. She has taught Remedies; Pre-trial Civil Practice; Practice Preparation; Legal Research and Writing; Legal Writing Skills; and Mediation Clinic.

Andrew R. Klein
Dean and Paul E. Beam Professor of Law
Indiana University Robert H, McKinney School of Law

Andrew R. Klein joined the faculty at IUPUI in 2000 and became Dean in the summer of 2013. He is also the Paul E. Beam Professor of Law. From 2010-2013, Dean Klein served as Chief of Staff to the Office of the Chancellor and Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at IUPUI. Before joining IU, he taught at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law and practiced with the Chicago firm of Sidley & Austin. Dean Klein earned a B.A. with distinction in journalism and economics from the University of Wisconsin and a J.D. with distinction from the Emory University School of Law, where he studied as a Robert W. Woodruff Fellow in Law and was editor-in-chief of the Emory Law Journal. Dean Klein’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of tort and environmental law. He is co-author of two casebooks, Toxic and Environmental Torts: Cases and Materials (Thomson/West 2011) and Torts: Cases, Problems and Exercises (Lexis/Nexis 4th ed. 2013), as well as a student-oriented textbook, Mastering Tort Law 2nd Edition (Carolina Academic Press 2016). Dean Klein is a member of the American Law Institute and serves on the executive committee of the Association of American Law Schools’ section on Torts and Compensation Systems. He also has served as Reporter for the Seventh Circuit United States Court of Appeals Civil Jury Instructions Committee and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Indianapolis and Indiana Bar Foundations. In addition, Dean Klein is a dedicated classroom teacher who has won ten student teaching awards during his career. He has also been a national lecturer on tort law for BarBri Bar Review.

Angela Lechleiter
Director, Academic Success Program
University of Louisville, Brandeis School of Law

Angela Lechleiter joined the Student Services department at Brandeis School of Law in August 2016. As director of the Academic Success Program, Angela works closely with first-year law students to help them achieve their personal best, academically and socially, in law school. She also teaches a bar prep course in the spring. Angela graduated from Brandeis in 2004 and is a licensed member of the Kentucky Bar. She also earned a Master of Education in Counseling from the University of Louisville. She is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and has worked as a college and career counselor, private practice therapist and substance abuse counselor. Angela’s husband, Dave, is a middle school science teacher. Lechleiter spends most of her free time with her family, including her preschool daughter, Nora, and two teenage stepsons, Jake and James.

Kent D. Lollis
Executive Director for Diversity Initiatives
Law School Admission Council (LSAC)

Kent D. Lollis is Executive Director for Diversity Initiatives at the Law School Admission Council. At LSAC, Mr. Lollis designs and directs programs to increase the number of lawyers from underrepresented minority groups, monitors the Council equal opportunity efforts in employment and vending, and serves as the principal staff liaison to LSAC Diversity Committee. He has received national recognition for his work in equal access to the legal profession including: the ABA Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Pipeline Diversity, the Association of American Law Schools Section on Support Award, and the St. Thomas More Award from St. Mary University School of Law. Prior to joining LSAC, he held faculty and administrative positions at the Ohio Northern University Claude W. Pettit College of Law and the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. He earned juris doctor and master of business administration degrees from Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Brown University.

Elaina Marino
Rising 3L
Syracuse University College of Law

Elaina Marino is the National Chairwoman for the Law Student Division of the Mindfulness in Law Society. She is a rising 3L at Syracuse University College of Law, and a graduate of SUNY Geneseo. As a 2L, Elaina helped to found Syracuse’s law school Mindfulness in the Law Society chapter, and serves as its president. She is interested in working in elder law and in bringing mindfulness to law firms.

Michael T. McCarthy
Director of Student Services
Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Michael T. McCarthy is the Director of Student Services at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Michael joined CWRU in 2011, working in the Career Development Office and transitioning to Student Services when the offices merged in October 2015. Among other responsibilities, Michael developed and co-manages the law school's Mentoring Alumni Program, manages student disability accommodations, and facilitates Diversity 360 sessions to students, staff, and faculty across campus. The law school's Class of 2017 selected Michael as Administrator of the Year. Michael co-presented a session on combined services offices at NALSAP's 2017 Annual Conference. He also presented on foreign graduate student counseling at the 2014 NALP Annual Education Conference, has written for the NALP Bulletin, and served as Vice Chair for several Newer Professionals Section committees. Michael stays active in his community, serving on the Board of Directors at the Shaker Heights Early Childhood Enrichment Center, the Board of Trustees for the Sussex Community Association and the Shaker Heights Fathers Committee. Prior to joining CWRU, he worked at Steptoe & Johnson, PLLC's Charleston, West Virginia office. Michael received his Juris Doctor from Washington and Lee University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Washington & Jefferson College.

Kristen Meeks
Assistant Director of Legal Resources
National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA)

Kristen Meeks an Assistant Director of Legal Resources at the National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA), where she assists in the enhancement of online legal resources, develops and implements NACUA online courses, and maintains the Higher Education Compliance Alliance, which is a centralized repository of resources to assist colleges and universities in their efforts to comply with federal laws and regulations. In addition, she assists in developing and implementing CLE programs and in collaborative programming efforts between NACUA and other higher education associations. Prior to joining NACUA, Kristen worked in an administrative capacity at the George Washington University Law School and at American University Washington College of Law, where she focused on career counseling and developing diversity and inclusion initiatives and professional development programs for law students. Kristen received her B.A. from Spelman College and her J.D. from the University of North Carolina. After law school, she clerked for the Honorable Zoe Bush of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and practiced as an Assistant Attorney General at the Office of the Attorney General for the District of Columbia.

Markeisha J. Miner
Dean of Students
Cornell Law School

Markeisha J. Miner is the Dean of Students at Cornell Law School. Previously, she served as Assistant Dean of Career Services and Outreach at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. Prior to that, she practiced as a commercial litigator in Dickinson Wright PLLC’s Detroit office, serving as an inaugural member of the firm’s Diversity Committee, and clerked for the Honorable Anna Diggs Taylor on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Markeisha earned her B.A., magna cum laude, at Mount Holyoke College and her J.D. at the University of Michigan Law School. As a law student, she served as Executive Editor of the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, Placement Chair for BLSA, and a student attorney in Michigan’s Legal Assistance for Urban Communities Clinic, where she assisted community development organizations in Detroit with their transactional legal needs. She also completed an externship at the Commission on Gender Equality in Durban, South Africa. She is an active member of NALSAP having served on the Nominating Committee in 2017 and 2018. Markeisha is a regular attendee at the AALS Student Services Section programming and is a member of the National Association for Law Placement (NALP).

James Nussbaum
Assistant General Counsel
Indiana University

James Nussbaum is an Assistant General Counsel for Indiana University. In addition to general university legal matters, James focuses his practice on University athletics, student affairs, and employment law. James earned his undergraduate degree in Economics and Political Science from Northwestern University and his J.D., cum laude, from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. He played football at Northwestern, where he was Academic All-Big Ten his junior and senior seasons. Prior to entering law school, James was a trade desk analyst at Performance Trust in Chicago.

Rachel W. Patterson
Director, Programs for Diversity
AccessLex Institute

Rachel W. Patterson joined the Center as Director, Programs for Diversity in 2017. Rachel comes to the Center from Georgetown University Law Center, where she served as Assistant Director of Admissions. At Georgetown, Rachel oversaw diversity recruitment initiatives, reviewed files, attended forums and helped plan diversity-related events for prospective students. Rachel earned her B.A. in English from the University of Pennsylvania where she played Division I basketball, and a Master of Science in Teaching degree from Pace University. Rachel began her career as an 8th grade English teacher in the Bronx with Teach for America and shortly thereafter attended law school at the University of Michigan where she served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Michigan Journal of Race and Law. After graduating from law school, Rachel worked for several non-profit organizations including the Association of American Law Schools as Assistant Director in Washington, DC and The Law and Leadership Institute as the Program Director in Columbus, Ohio. At AALS, Rachel provided ongoing support to members of the Executive Committee and Membership Review Committee, particularly as it related to assessing whether schools were complying with the organization’s diversity requirements. At LLI, Rachel recruited 8th grade students to participate in a four-year pipeline program designed to help students from underserved communities to get into college and ultimately law school. In addition, Rachel trained and evaluated instructors and created and edited the curriculum. At AccessLex, Rachel oversees the Legal Education Diversity Pipeline Grant Program and is responsible for implementing the organization’s diversity initiatives designed to help increase the number of underrepresented students admitted to law school.

Kathryn Pelham
Assistant Director of Academic Success and Bar Preparation
Stetson University College of Law

Kathryn Pelham returned to her alma mater, Stetson University College of Law, as an Assistant Director of Academic Success and Bar Preparation in August 2012. As of April 2017, she now serves as the Associate Director of Academic Success and Bar Preparation Services, and the ADA Coordinator. As Associate Director, she is involved in every stage of a law student's career from orientation to passing a bar exam through individual coaching, workshop presentations, and campus-wide events. As the ADA Coordinator, she serves both as disability resource and compliance officers by meeting with all students with disabilities, granting accommodations, arranging implementation of those accommodations, and monitoring campus-wide programmatic, technologic, and physical compliance. After earning her Juris Doctor degree and becoming a member of the Florida Bar in 2006, she practiced as an Assistant State Attorney and Guardian ad Litem Attorney in the 6th Judicial Circuit. Her solo practice focused on the areas of Adoption and Family Law, Child Dependency, and represented First Responders under Florida’s Heart and Lung Bill in Workers' Compensation cases. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, and a Minor in Economics from the University of South Florida.

Johnny Pryor
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Indiana University Robert H, McKinney School of Law

Johnny Pryor is the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs at Indiana University Robert H, McKinney School of Law. He earned his J.D at Indiana University School of Law- Bloomingdale. After law school, Dean Pryor served as an Assistant Clark County Prosecutor in Springfield, Ohio. He worked primarily in the civil division providing legal counsel to county boards, departments and elected officials on areas of law such as employment, real estate, zoning, and contracts. Since 2005, Dean Pryor has served in various roles providing leadership for programs designed to assist undergraduates interested in law school and other graduate programs at Butler University and Dartmouth College. He has advised hundreds of students from diverse backgrounds helping them gain admission to some of the most selective law and graduate programs. In addition, he served as an adjunct instructor at Wittenberg University where he taught both law and Mock Trial Association, and former at-large board member of the Northeast Association of Pre-Law Advisors. Recently, Dean Pryor completed a two-year term on the executive committee of the Association of American Law School Student Services Section, and he currently serves as founding president of the National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals.

Rosemary Queenan
Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Professor of Law
Albany Law School

Rosemary Queenan is the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and a Professor at Albany Law School. Rosemary joined Albany Law in 2007, following 13 years of practice in government and the private sector in New York City. She teaches Civil Procedure, New York Practice, Introduction to Lawyering and Appellate Practice. In her role as Dean of Students, she counsels students, serves as an advisor to individual students, student organizations and several moot court competitions and oversees the orientation program and wellness initiatives. She also oversees the Career and Professional Development Center. Rosemary received a B.A. from University of Maryland, College Park and her J.D. from New York Law School. She is the current Chair of the AALS Section on Student Services.

Jino P. Ray
Director for Admissions
Howard University School of Law

Jino P. Ray currently serves as the Director for Admissions for the Howard University School of Law. Prior to joining the staff at HUSL, he served as the Assistant Director of Admissions and Diversity & Inclusion for The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and as an Admission Counselor for the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University in Birmingham, AL. Jino holds a B.S. in Political Science from Florida State University and a J.D. from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law. Prior to law school, Jino began his career in the fields of education and youth development. He taught middle school Social Studies and worked as an Education Liaison advocating for the special education needs of foster youth in Florida; coordinated education and employment programs for homeless youth in Hollywood, CA; and served as the program director for SoBRO YouthBuild in Bronx, NY. His professional interests include diversity and inclusion in legal education and the legal profession with an emphasis on redefining “merit” and developing dynamic pipeline programs that empower students from marginalized groups, particularly Black males, to successfully navigate the entire arc the legal pipeline. Jino is a native of Cairo, GA and is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. A lifelong thespian, he enjoys singing, acting and writing in his spare time.

Richard C. Reuben
James Lewis Parks Professor of Law and Journalism
University of Missouri School of Law

Richard C. Reuben is the James Lewis Parks Professor of Law and Journalism at the University of Missouri School of Law, where he teaches a variety of public law and dispute resolution courses. He has practiced mindfulness for nearly 20 years, and has taught and studied mindfulness for more than 10 years. Professor Reuben founded the AALS Balance Section’s Mindfulness Affinity Group in 2014, and, with Rebecca Simon (Southwestern Law School) co-founded the Mindfulness in Law Society in 2016. MILS is an umbrella organization that seeks to facilitate mindfulness awareness, groups, and activities within the legal profession. www.mindfulnessinlawsociety.com. Professor Reuben is the author of Bringing Mindfulness into the Classroom: A Personal Account, 61 J. Legal Ed. 674 (2011), and the forthcoming Short and Happy Guide to Mindfulness for Lawyers (West Academic, forthcoming 2019). He is also the Principal Investigator, with positive psychologist Ken Sheldon, of the first empirical study to assess the utility of mindfulness to help first year law students manage their stress and improve their academic performance.

Troy A. Riddle
Assistant Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer
The John Marshall Law School

Troy A. Riddle is Assistant Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago, IL. He also served as Title IX Coordinator and Interim Dean of Student Life and Leadership. Prior to joining The John Marshall Law School he served as Assistant Dean and Multicultural Affairs Officer, working with both Student Affairs and Admissions offices at Widener University Delaware Law School. At Widener, he also served as an adjunct professor and administrative advisor for student organization, three law journals and the Student Bar Association. He is committed to the support and development of law students and creating more inclusive law school communities. Before joining Widener Law, he served as Assistant Director for Diversity Initiatives with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) where he was responsible for DiscoverLaw.org content, programming and national Campus Coordinator activities. Troy was also instrumental in launching LSAC’s Diversity Matters Award, which encourages and recognizes the diversity efforts of LSAC’s ABA-approved member law schools. He has earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in Business Administration, a J.D. from Widener University - Delaware Law School and is licensed to practice in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Mya Rimon
Assistant Dean, Students
Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

Mya Rimon, LL.B. is the Assistant Dean, Students at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. As the Assistant Dean, Students at Osgoode Hall Law School, Mya has oversight of all aspects of student services, including providing support and direction to students in need of accommodation. Before becoming Assistant Dean in 2012, Mya was the Director of Osgoode's Career Development Office and, before that, was the Senior Manager, Faculty Administration at the Law School. Mya holds a Bachelor of Arts from Western University and an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall Law School.

Larry D. Robertson
Assistant General Counsel and Title IX Coordinator
Valparaiso University

Larry D. Robertson is the Assistant General Counsel and Title IX Coordinator for Valparaiso University. As Assistant General Counsel, Larry advises and counsels the University on student-life matters, employment matters, FERPA, Clery Act, Title VI and Section 504 compliance. As Title IX Coordinator, Larry oversees and enforces the University’s Non-discrimination, Harassment, and Sexual Misconduct Policy. In his role, Larry also advises, counsels and co-chairs the University’s Bias Incident Response Team. Prior to joining the University, Larry was an associate attorney with Littler Mendelson, P.C. in Chicago, Illinois—one of the world’s largest labor and employment law firms. His law practice involved litigating employment discrimination, harassment and retaliation claims in federal and state court and in administrative proceedings before the EEOC, OSHA, Illinois Department of Human Rights, Iowa Civil Rights Commission, Ohio Civil Rights Commission, and other federal and state administrative agencies. Additionally, Larry’s practice involved advising and counseling employers on compliance with Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Illinois Human Rights Act, the Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act, the Cook County Human Rights Ordinance, the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance, the Chicago Human Rights Ordinance, the Chicago Minimum Wage and Paid Sick Leave Ordinance, and other local, state, and federal laws. Larry also advised and counseled employers on leaves of absence, disability accommodations, wage and hour issues, workplace inclusion issues, employment agreements, and employment policies, practices and procedures. Prior to his legal career, Larry enjoyed a background in the performing arts. He performed as a principal dancer with Washington DC’s Edgeworks Dance Theater, and as an apprentice dancer with Chicago’s Deeply Rooted Dance Theater 2. He performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the Chicago Theatre. Larry earned his Juris Doctor cum laude from Loyola University Chicago School of Law. He earned his Bachelor of Arts cum laude in Sociology from George Mason University.

Susie Spies Roth
Associate Dean and Dean of Students, Clinical Assistant Professor of Law
Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Susie Spies Roth is the Associate Dean and Dean of Students and a Clinical Assistant Professor of Law at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. Susie joined the Law School in September of 2009 as the Director of Academic and Professional Excellence (APEx), and then became the Assistant Dean of Student Services in the fall of 2013. Susie is passionate about providing meaningful, individualized support to students and fostering a culture of inclusion, maturity, professionalism, camaraderie, and happiness at Northwestern Law. Susie earned her B.A. from Northwestern University and her J.D. magna cum laude from Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. She is a member of the Order of the Coif and, while in law school, served as Membership Editor of the Northwestern University Law Review. Before returning to Northwestern Law, Susie clerked for the Honorable Kenneth F. Ripple on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and worked in Sidley Austin LLP’s General Litigation group.

Nicole Sandoz
Director of Student Life and Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Liaison (SARVL)
Georgetown University Law Center

Nicole Sandoz joined Georgetown Law in February 2016 as the Director of Student Life and Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Liaison (SARVL). She was an administrator at Cornell Law from 2013-2016, where she served as the Director of Career Services, an adjunct professor of law, an advisor to several student organizations, and a co-investigator in Title IX sexual misconduct matters. Nicole is a graduate of Amherst College and Cornell Law. At Cornell, she was President of the Black Law Students Association and an active leader in the Public Interest Law Union and Women's Law Coalition. After law school, Nicole practiced for five years as a labor and employment attorney in Los Angeles, first at Paul Hastings Janofsky & Walker and later at Davis Wright Tremaine. As Director, Nicole oversees the Office of Student Life and its many co-curricular programs, including Orientation, our 120+ student organizations, the Peer Advisor program, and room scheduling. She is the primary administrative liaison to the Student Bar Association and is a facilitator in the Lawyers in Balance program. Nicole also serves as the SARVL for the Law Center. Nicole provides support and confidential options counseling to student survivors of sexual assault and other forms of relationship violence.

Ann McGonigle Santos
Associate Dean of Students and Disability Services Coordinator
Suffolk University Law School

Ann McGonigle Santos is Associate Dean of Students as well as Disability Services Coordinator for Suffolk University Law School in Boston, MA. A graduate of Brown University and Northeastern University School of Law, she joined the Middlesex County District Attorney’s Office in Cambridge, MA where she worked on a variety of cases ranging from Domestic Violence to Arson to Murder. Ann then joined the Legal Practice Skills faculty of Suffolk University School of Law in 1998, as an Associate Professor of Legal Writing for 16 years before joining the Dean of Students Office in 2014. In this role she works alongside Laura Ferrari in handling a myriad of student issues as well as managing all students with Disabilities, while teaching 1-2 courses each year.

Emily L. Scivoletto
Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs
UCLA School of Law

Emily Scivoletto is the Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs at UCLA School of Law. She coordinates designated academic programs and curriculum development, provides students with support to meet their academic, professional and personal goals and teaches in the areas of ethics, leadership and the legal profession. She regularly presents workshops and meets with students to provide academic advising, personal counseling, and guidance on student life & activities, diversity and inclusion issues, state bar licensure and overall success in law school. She previously taught and served as Director of Academic Success at UC Davis and McGeorge Law Schools, and served as Dean of Students at USD Law School. Prior to entering academia she practiced law in Sacramento for six years, where she handled insurance defense and civil rights litigation cases. She holds a J.D. degree from Pacific McGeorge School of Law, an M.A. degree in Higher Education from California State University Sacramento and a B.A. degree from UC Irvine. Emily is a founding member and the Treasurer of the National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals.

Marcia Lynn Sells
Dean of Students
Harvard Law School

Marcia Lynn Sells, Dean of Students at Harvard Law School was a long time Columbia University senior administrator. She held positions as Associate Dean in the School of the Arts for Outreach & Education and Associate Vice President, Program Development and Initiatives, for the office of Government and Community Affairs. Dean Sells has held a variety of progressively responsible positions in academia, the private sector and public service including: Educational Consultant for Dance Theatre of Harlem, Vice President of Employee and Organizational Development for Reuters America, Vice President of Organizational Development & Human Resources, and Vice President Player Education and Development for the National Basketball Association, Dean of Students at Columbia University School of Law, and Assistant District Attorney trying rape and child abuse cases for the Kings County District Attorney’s Office. Marcia earned her Juris Doctorate from Columbia University School of Law and her Bachelor of Arts from Barnard College.

Cathleen Sharader
President
Indiana Board of Law Examiners (BLE)

Cathleen Sharader serves as President of the Indiana Board of Law Examiners (BLE). The Board of Law Examiners is an agency of the Indiana Supreme Court and is responsible for the licensing of attorneys in the state of Indiana. The Indiana Supreme Court appointed Cathleen to the Indiana BLE in 2010. Cathleen is admitted to practice before the Indiana state courts, the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. Courts of Appeal for the Sixth, Seventh, and Eleventh Circuits, and the U.S. District Courts for the Northern and Southern Districts of Indiana and the Western District of Michigan. Cathleen has been listed in the Best Lawyers in America® publication for Appellate Practice and Commercial Litigation since 2012 and in the Super Lawyers® publication for Business Litigation since 2013. She has been recognized by Martindale-Hubbell as an AV® Preeminent™ rated attorney based on its peer review ratings. Focusing on appellate practice and complex business litigation, Cathleen Shrader has extensive experience in civil litigation. She is experienced in representing clients at all levels of the appellate process; businesses in contract, warranty, intellectual property, and other disputes; and trustees, beneficiaries, and personal representatives in complex estate and trust disputes. In 1990, Cathleen graduated cum laude from Indiana University School of Business with a B.S. in Business Economics. In 1994, she received her J.D. from Duke University, where she served as Research Editor for the Duke Law Journal.

Pam Shea
Assistant Director of Student Life and Interim Co-Director of Career Development
University of North Dakota School of Law

Pam Shea is the Assistant Director of Student Life and Interim Co-Director of Career Development at University of North Dakota School of Law. Pam joined UND School of Law in 2011. In her roles, she works primarily with programming, student organizations, career development, admissions/recruitment, and data reporting (ABA, NALP, U.S. News, etc.). Pam serves as the Past-President of UND Staff Senate. Prior to joining the School of Law, she worked with the College of Nursing and Professional Development at UND as the Graduate Program Specialist, assisting with admissions, retention and student records. Pam received her Master of Science degree in Educational Leadership – Higher Education from University of North Dakota and her Bachelor of Science degree in Childhood Studies Education from Plymouth State University.

Bradley W. Skolnik
Executive Director
Indiana Office of Admissions and Continuing Education, Indiana Supreme Court

Bradley W. Skolnik is the Executive Director of the Indiana Office of Admissions and Continuing Education (ACE), the Indiana Supreme Court agency responsible for ensuring that applicants satisfy all the requirements for admission to the bar and overseeing the continuing legal education requirements of attorneys. Prior to his appointment as ACE’s executive director, Mr. Skolnik served for more than five years as the executive director of the Indiana Board of Law Examiners (BLE). On January 26, 2017, when the Indiana Supreme Court merged the agencies that provide administrative support for the BLE and the Indiana Commission on Continuing Legal Education into the new Office of Admissions and Continuing Education, Mr. Skolnik was appointed as ACE’s first executive director. From December 1994 through December 2002, he served as the Indiana Securities Commissioner in the office of the Indiana Secretary of State. While Securities Commissioner, Mr. Skolnik served a one-year term as the President of the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA), the umbrella organization of state and provincial securities regulators in the United States and Canada. He also served a term as the Chair of NASAA’s Enforcement Section, which coordinates the enforcement activities of state securities regulators. Following his stint as Securities Commissioner, Mr. Skolnik was a partner with an Indianapolis law firm, practicing in the areas of securities regulation, financial services and general corporate litigation. Mr. Skolnik presently serves as a member of the National Conference of Bar Examiners’ Technology Committee and as chair of the Council of Bar Admissions Administrators’ Program Committee. He is a recipient of the NASAA Outstanding Service Award and the NASAA “Blue Sky Cube” award. He is a graduate of Michigan State University (B.A. 1978) and the Indiana University Maurer School of Law (J.D. 1981). Mr. Skolnik is a member of the Indiana Bar.

Nancy Sperling
Manager, Academic Programs & Records
Osgood Hall Law School, York University

Nancy Sperling is the Manager, Academic Programs & Records at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University . Nancy has been managing the Programs & Records Office at Osgoode Hall Law School for over 20 years. She and her team are responsible for all registrarial services at Osgoode. Nancy also works closely with students to implement accommodation plans for final examinations. Nancy attended Seneca College in Toronto and graduated with a diploma in Administrative Studies.

Janet Sterns
Dean of Students and Lecturer in Law
University of Miami Law School

Janet Stearns, Dean of Students and Lecturer in Law, joined the University of Miami Law School in October, 1999 as director of International and Foreign Graduate Programs. In 2007 she was appointed Dean of Students. Since 2011, Dean Stearns also teaches Professional Responsibility each fall and spring semester. At the University of Miami, she serves as Title IX Liaison, a member of the President’s Coalition the President’s Coalition on Sexual Violence Prevention and Education, a member of President’s Commission on Alcohol and Other Drugs, and a member of the UM Wellness Center Advisory Board. Dean Stearns is Chair-Elect of the AALS Student Services Section. She is also newly appointed to the American Bar Association Advisory Committee to the Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs, where she is an advocate for wellness programming in law schools. Since becoming Dean of Students, Dean Stearns has been passionate about wellness initiatives, including the Fall Wellness Week, the spring Mental Health Day, and a weekly Dean of Students Constitutional (walk) around the campus. She coordinates closely with the School’s Mindfulness in Law program, and drafted the Preface to Scott Roger’s book Mindfulness for Law Students (Mindful Living Press, 2009). A native of New York, she is a graduate of Yale College (1984) and Yale Law School (1988). She was admitted to the bar in Connecticut (1989) and Washington State (1994). Before coming to UM, Dean Stearns was a profesora visitante at the University of Chile where she taught two law courses in Spanish. She also taught in the area of affordable housing development and directed a clinical program at the University of Washington School of Law. In her senior year at Yale College, she was elected to the New Haven Board of Aldermen where she served for two years until beginning law school. Yale Law School, she received both the C. LaRue Munson Prize for Clinical Work and the Clifford L. Porter Prize for Best Paper in Taxation. Upon her graduation from Yale Law, she practiced law for five years with Robinson & Cole, a large commercial firm in Hartford, Connecticut. Her practice areas included commercial real estate, land use, and nonprofit organizations. She was admitted to practice law in both Connecticut (1989)and Washington State (1994). Her community activities include serving as the Advocacy Chair for the Miami Affiliate of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. She previously served as President of the Miami Council for International Visitors (2006-2007) and Treasurer of the Coral Reef Senior High School Lacrosse Booster. She is a very proud mother of twin sons, Justin who attends Haverford College and Gabriel who attends Boston University.

Aaron N. Taylor
Executive Director
AccessLex Institute Center for Legal Education Excellence

Aaron N. Taylor is the Executive Director of the AccessLex Institute Center for Legal Education Excellence. He joined AccessLex from Saint Louis University School of Law, where he served as a faculty member. Before that, Dr. Taylor served as an administrator at various higher education institutions, mainly working as a law school admission officer. From 2014 until January of this year, Dr. Taylor served as director of the Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE), a national study that seeks to measure the effects of legal education on students. Dr. Taylor’s primary research interests are in the areas of higher education law and policy. His articles have appeared in journals published by American University, Howard University, Stanford University, University of Notre Dame, and others. His commentaries have appeared in numerous publications, including the Chronicle of Higher Education and Diverse Issues in Higher Education. He is also a frequent media commentator on education and diversity issues. Professor Taylor received a bachelor of arts in political science from North Carolina A&T State University, a juris doctor from Howard University, and a doctorate in higher education leadership and policy from Vanderbilt University. He is also an alumnus of the Harvard University Administrative Fellowship Program and a member of the Florida Bar.

Sondra R. Tennessee
Associate Dean for Student Affairs
University of Houston Law Center

Sondra R. Tennessee is the Associate Dean for Student Affairs overseeing admissions, career development, registration, scholarships and financial aid, bar preparation, student counseling and advising, study abroad programs, and graduate programs at the University of Houston Law Center. Before joining the UH Law Center, she also worked at the University of Oklahoma College of Law and Washington University School of Law. Dean Tennessee has worked with a wide range of prospective students who are considering applying to law school. Once admitted, she then counsels law students who are trying to balance the complexities of a challenging academic curriculum and life’s obstacles. Active in legal education nationally, Dean Tennessee serves in leadership positions in several organizations, such as the the chair for the LSAC Diversity Committee, co-chair for the ABA Associate Deans Conference, and a member of the ABA Commission on Lawyers Assistance Programs. Graduating from Vanderbilt University with bachelors in Philosophy and from Washington University in St. Louis with a law degree, Dean Tennessee has used her education to help others achieve their goals. She lives in Pearland, Texas with her husband Gregory, their son Jacob and two furry friends, Humphrey and Poppy.

Kellye Testy
President and CEO, Law School Admission Council (LSAC)
Former Dean and Professor of Law, University of Washington School of Law

Kellye Testy was the 14th dean and first woman to lead the University of Washington School of Law, a post she held from 2009-17. She now serves as the president and CEO of the Law School Admission Council. A prolific scholar, outstanding teacher, and experienced administrator, Testy focuses her research and scholarship on contracts, corporate governance, business entities, leadership, and access to justice. She is known throughout academic and legal communities for her dedication to the rule of law and its commitment to justice and equality.

Nancy L. Vincent
Director of Administration
Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar

Nancy L. Vincent is the current Director of Administration for the Illinois Board of Admissions to the Bar, taking a circuitous route to that position via public defense in three states, private practice in one, and corrections representation in two. She holds degrees from Murray State University (B.S.), Washington University in St. Louis (J.D.), and Loyola University – Chicago (LL.M.), and is a member of the Bar in Missouri, Illinois, and New Mexico. When she isn’t working tirelessly so that her two dogs and one cat can lounge around in comfort, she is creating something from fiber with sticks, hooks, needles, or mechanical contraptions, and baking treats for the employees of the Board.

Colin Watrin
Assistant Director for Admissions and Student Life
Seattle University School of Law

Colin Watrin is the Assistant Director for Admissions and Student Life at the Seattle University School of Law. In this role he coordinates efforts related to retention, wellness, and diversity programming. Colin is also the primary advisor for the Student Bar Association, and leads personal and professional training opportunities for student leaders. Colin is also part of the SU Law admissions team, reviewing files, counseling prospective students, and traveling to recruitment events. Colin previously worked with Parent and Family Programs in the Vice President for Student Affairs Office at Colorado State University, and as a Senior Admissions Counselor at Western Washington University. He holds a M.S. in Student Affairs in Higher Education, and a B.A. in Sociology & Communication. Outside of work Colin follows his passion for civic engagement and leadership development by serving as the Director of Programs for the Washington Chapter of the Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership volunteer organization.