2017 NALSAP Conference

The inaugural NALSAP Conference will be held at UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles, California from Thursday, June 1 to Saturday, June 3, 2017.

 

Conference Schedule

All sessions will take place on the first floor of the UCLA School of Law building on the northeast corner of the UCLA campus.

 

Wednesday Night, May 31, 2017

Early Check In and No-Host Gathering at the W Hotel

Arriving in Los Angeles on Wednesday? Stop by the W Hotel in Westwood (easy walking distance from all conference hotels) and join the Conference Committee and other conference attendees for the happiest two hours in law student affairs history!

Early Check In Available
5:00 to 7:00 p.m.
W Hotel
930 Hilgard Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90024

Thursday, June 1, 2017

8:15 to 9:25 a.m.
Check In to NALSAP Conference (Law School Foyer)

9:30 to 10:15 a.m.
Welcome and NALSAP Opening Meeting (Room 1347)

10:15 to 11:30 a.m.
Plenary Session #1 - Higher Education Law for Student Affairs Professionals (Room 1347)

11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Vendor Fair (Shapiro Courtyard)

12:00 p.m.
Lunch (Shapiro Courtyard)

1:15 to 2:00 p.m.
Concurrent Session #1 (choose one)
Campus Climate for Non-JD Students: Strategies for Inclusion of Graduate Program & International Students (Room 1447)
Infusing Professional Development in Law School Student Services: "No Parents, No Puppies, No Pouting!" (Room 1457)

2:15 to 3:00 p.m.
Concurrent Session #2 (choose one)
Culturally Competent: Using Orientation to Teach First-Year Students about Implicit Bias (Room 1447)
Developing, Launching, and Maintaining a Team-Based Student Mentorship and Advising Program for Law Students (Room 1457)

3:15 to 4:00 p.m.
Concurrent Session #3 (choose one)
Low Black Law Student Enrollment, Critical Race Theory, and the Pursuit of a Legal Education (Room 1447)
Ready or Not - Generation Z is coming to law school (Room 1457)

4:15 to 5:15 p.m.
Plenary Session #2 - What We Wish We Would Have Known: Seasoned Student Affairs Deans Give Guidance from "Advising" to “Zombies” (Room 1347)

5:30 to 7:00 p.m.
NALSAP Welcome Reception - Sponsored by Kaplan (Shapiro Courtyard)

Friday, June 2, 2017

8:15 to 9:15 a.m.
Breakfast - Sponsored by Themis (Shapiro Courtyard)

8:30 to 9:00 a.m.
Guided Morning Meditation (Beginners Welcome) (Zen Zone/Shapiro Courtyard)

9:15 to 10:15 a.m.
Plenary Session #3 - Faculty-Student Affairs Partnerships to Humanize the Classroom Climate (Room 1347)

10:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Concurrent Session #4 (choose one)
Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence in Law School: The Link Between Mental Wellness and Academic Success (Room 1430)
A Law School Mentoring Model: How Student Affairs Professionals Can Use Mentoring Principles to Support Marginalized Students (Room 1447)

11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Vendor Fair (Shapiro Courtyard)

12:00 noon
Lunch (Shapiro Courtyard)

1:15 to 2:15 p.m.
NALSAP Business Meeting #2 (Room 1347)

2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Concurrent Session #5 (choose one)
Student Development Theory Crash Course for Law School Student Affairs Professionals (Room 1347)
Student Well-Being: Providing Autonomy Support by Helping Students Take Ownership of their Narrative – Their “Story” Coming to Law School, Being in Law School, and Moving Beyond Law School (Room 1430)
Planning Your Career in Student Affairs – Moving Up (Or Beyond?) the Law School Ladder Room 1447)

3:45 to 4:45 p.m.
Concurrent Session #6 (choose one)
Teaching Students to Report Misconduct in Law School and the Real World: The Role of Student Services Professionals (Room 1430)
A More Perfect Union: How Combined Student Services Offices Can Prosper in an Age of Decreasing Budgets and Increasing Demands (Room 1447)

5:00 p.m.
Dinner on your own (Westwood dining options)

Saturday, June 3, 2017

7:30 to 8:00 a.m.
Walk with Conference Committee Members (UCLA) - meet at Shapiro Courtyard

8:15 to 9:15 a.m.
Coffee/Tea (Shapiro Courtyard)

9:15 to 10:15 a.m.
Concurrent Session #7 (choose one)
To Counsel or To Coach? Determining the Best Approach & Practices for Different Settings (Room 1447)
Collaborative Processes of Determining Effective Accommodations in Law School (Room 1457)

10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Plenary Session #4 - Responding to Mental Health Trends: Developing Your Counseling "Tool Box" (Room 1347)

11:30 to 11:50 a.m.
Closing Remarks and NALSAP Traditions (Room 1347)

12:00 to 1:15 p.m.
Networking lunch (Shapiro Courtyard)

1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
[OPTIONAL] QPR Training (Suicide Prevention Training) (Room 1447)

 

Plenary Sessions

The following plenary sessions will be held on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Plenary sessions are designated by the NALSAP Conference Committee as sessions that all NALSAP Conference participants should attend. They involve a broad range of topics designed to enhance professional knowledge and skills.

Higher Education Law for Student Affairs Professionals

Catherine Matthews, Assistant Dean of Students, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Student affairs professionals are on the front lines of many issues in our law schools—student conduct, student health, professional development, ADA accommodations, bar disclosures, and more. These issues are challenging enough, but much of our day-to-day work involves legal issues that we may not immediately see. This session introduces some of the primary legal issues for student affairs professionals and discusses applications for our work with students.

Thursday, June 1 - 10:15 a.m. Room 1347

 

What We Wish We Would Have Known: Seasoned Student Affairs Deans Give Guidance from "Advising" to “Zombies”

Mitchell Balin, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students, Georgetown University Law Center
Cara H. Foerst, Associate Dean for Academics, Seton Hall School of Law
Markeisha J. Miner, Dean of Students, Cornell Law School
Emily Scivoletto, Panel Moderator, Assistant Dean for Student Services & Academic Affairs, UCLA School of Law

This panel of experienced deans of students will provide guidance on all things (from “A to Z”) related to the practice of law school student affairs. This panel will allow a lot of time for Q&A and will key in on those issues with which we all struggle. Come hear the seasoned experts tell it like it is!

Thursday, June 1 - 4:15 p.m. Room 1347


Faculty-Student Affairs Partnerships to Humanize the Classroom Climate

Mitchell Bailin, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students, Georgetown University Law Center
Maura DeMouy, Director of Academic Success, Georgetown University Law Center
David Jaffe, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, American University Washington College of Law
Jerry Organ, Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, University of St. Thomas, Minnesota School of Law

There is much to celebrate in the ways that student affairs professionals have raised awareness about the mental health and addiction issues that plague law students and the legal profession. Recent research from the ABA and Dean Jaffe and Professor Organ’s Law Student Survey of Wellbeing confirm, however, that these issues persist. The time has come to change the classroom climate that can amplify and exacerbate these problems. Given law student affairs professionals’ close work with students and faculty, they are uniquely positioned to educate faculty on ways to improve the classroom environment. Georgetown Law, University of St. Thomas Law, American’s Washington College of Law and other law schools have been laboratories for developing successful partnerships with faculty on initiatives focused on classroom climate and self-care. This program will highlight these initiatives and provide participants with guidance for implementing similar initiatives at their own law schools.

Friday, June 2 - 9:15 a.m. Room 1347

 

Responding to the Mental Health Trends: Developing Your Own "Counseling Toolbox"

Dr. Connie Horton, Associate Vice President for Student Life, Senior Director, Counseling, Health, and Wellness, Licensed Psychologist, Pepperdine University

Many law student affairs professionals have an advanced degree in law or higher education, but few are mental health professionals or have significant training in personal counseling. And yet, on an almost daily basis, law student affairs professionals provide emotional, mental and spiritual support for students (and faculty/staff) in need. Dr. Horton will review student mental health trends and provide a concrete and practical "counseling toolbox" for those who are not trained in the mental health field but who strive to provide advice, support and "counsel" on a regular basis.

Saturday, June 3 - 10:30 a.m. Room 1347

 

[Optional] Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) Suicide Prevention Training

Saeromi Kim, Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Director, Counseling and Psychological Services, UCLA

This two-hour session from UCLA Counseling Services is designed to help student affairs professionals recognize warning signs for suicide and to assist others in need. The QPR (Question-Persuade-Refer) Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training Program, is a community-focused, nationally-recognized, empirically-based suicide prevention program, that educates students, staff and faculty about suicide and the resources available for those needing professional help.

QPR is intended to teach individuals how to recognize the warning signs of suicide, and provides guidelines on how to:
Question a person about potential suicidal thoughts,
Persuade them to seek help, and
Refer them to appropriate professional services.

This workshop is not a certification program. For certification services and for more information, visit www.qprinstitute.com.

Saturday, June 3 - 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Room 1447

 

Concurrent Sessions

Sessions are listed in chronological order.

Campus Climate for Non-JD Students: Strategies for Inclusion of Graduate Program & International Students

Melissa Berry, Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services, University of Washington School of Law
Oscar Teran, Assistant Director of Career Services, Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law

The fastest growing population at most law schools today is the non-JD population. In the past ten years, a wide variety of graduate degree programs have been created, the most recent of which are one-year Masters of Jurisprudence programs, and the number of international students has skyrocketed. Schools are struggling with how to break down programmatic silos and create a genuinely inclusive culture for all students. This program will examine the similarities and differences between JD, LLM, MJ, and PhD. students’ backgrounds, experiences, and needs for support from student affairs professionals. Participants will have the opportunity to share ideas/programs that are working well (or not) at their schools and to contribute to the identification of best practices to create an inclusive environment for non-JD populations. Special consideration will be given to support for international students during this critical time. Participants will leave with concrete ideas for integration and inclusion of all students.

Thursday, June 1 - 1:15 p.m. Room 1447

 

Infusing Professional Development in Law School Student Services: “No Parents, No Puppies, No Pouting!”

Laura Ferrari, Dean of Students, Suffolk University Law School
Ann McGonigle Santos, Associate Dean of Students, Suffolk University Law School

This panel will discuss ideas on guiding today’s young law students on how to advocate for themselves in both an academic and professional setting and to communicate professionally both in and out of the classroom. We will discuss innovative programming to address these concerns and how we have addressed the unique challenges of facing undergraduate influences within a University system. Participants will learn how to navigate, through policy development and programming, the emphasis on professional development and taking responsibility in law school. We will discuss the implementation of policies such as: no parent involvement and essential performance standards. The discussion will include how to help students with self-management of medical and mental health issues; setting the boundaries and expectations at Orientation through programming – explaining to students what we can do for them and what we will not; navigating University policies with a strong undergraduate influence; teaching, through various programming throughout their law school career, the skill of professional communication; and training students to think about the use of social media as a law student and prospective lawyer.

Thursday, June 1 - 1:15 p.m. Room 1457

 

Culturally Competent: Using Orientation to Teach First-Year Students about Implicit Bias

DeShun Harris, Assistant Director of Academic Support, Texas A&M University School of Law

Each year, first-year law students begin their law school careers with an orientation. Students are often excited to begin their study and ultimate practice of law. However, many of these students are likely unaware that as they enter and transition through law school and into practice that implicit bias, a bias one is not consciously aware of, has the ability to derail civil interactions with their colleagues and professors, client interviews, and even their communications with judges. Further, complicating matters is the general assumption that this generation of law students, many of whom are Millennials, are more tolerant than previous generations. However, studies have found this generation is just as susceptible to bias as previous generations. Thus, it is important that our students are not only informed about implicit bias but are also taught mechanisms to combat implicit bias. Understanding implicit bias is important to law students because the law school classroom is where they encounter sensitive topics, and it is important because of the effect that it may have on their interactions and representation of future clients. Orientation is an opportune time to teach students about implicit bias to equip them with the awareness and tools needed to address implicit bias. This presentation will address what implicit bias is and why it is important for law students to learn about implicit bias. Further, attendees to this presentation will leave with activities and resources that can be used to teach students about implicit bias and how to mitigate it.

Thursday, June 1 - 2:15 p.m. Room 1447

 

Developing, Launching, and Maintaining a Team-Based Student Mentorship and Advising Program for Law Students

Alex Sklut, Associate Director of Student Affairs, University of Georgia School of Law
Kalianne Neumann, Doctoral Student in Learning, Design, and Technology, University of Georgia

A mentor’s guidance can have an incredible positive impact on law students’ experiences and future careers. A team-based mentorship and advising program provides maximum law student support and law school community building. Through a presentation, participants will learn how to successfully develop, launch, and maintain a team-based mentorship and advising program from the ground up. The presentation will use the Georgia Law Mentorship Program as a model, whose team- based mentorship and advising program includes students, peer mentors, faculty mentors, and alumni & professional mentors. A demonstration on how to use the Google platform as an electronic host for the mentorship program is included in the presentation.

Thursday, June 1 - 2:15 p.m. Room 1457

 

Low Black Law Student Enrollment, Critical Race Theory, and the Pursuit of a Legal Education

Jennah Jones, Executive Director of Student Affairs, UC Irvine School of Law

This presentation will address the issue of low Black law student enrollment through a recent case study of Black students at an ABA accredited institution. The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences and perceptions of current Black law school students in order to identify the challenges in pursuing a legal education, and to identify how they mitigated these challenges. The discussion will include an exploration of how Critical Race Theory can be used to both understand and enhance Black law students’ experiences. To supplement the case study data, participants will engage in a discussion of best practices. Ultimately, this presentation will help practitioners understand the implications for practice in supporting students of color.

Thursday, June 1 - 3:15 p.m. Room 1447

 

Ready or Not - Generation Z is coming to Law School

Colin Watrin, Assistant Director, Admissions & Student Life, Seattle University School of Law

Just when we thought we had Millennials figured out they are moving on, and Generation Z is arriving in our law school classrooms. What are the differences between Millennials and Gen Z? What is distinctive about their learning style, motivations, and educational expectations? This interactive presentation will focus on developing an understanding of the unique characteristics and needs of the incoming generation of law students. This session will be grounded in concepts related to Generational Theory and Emerging Adulthood to provide a framework for discussion of the cultural, generational, and social considerations that have shaped the students who will make up the majority of our incoming classes for the next decade. Participants will have the opportunity to compare anecdotes related to changing trends they have observed in law students, discuss strategies for effectively engaging students from a digital generation, and hopefully have fun reflecting internally on characteristics of their own generation and how they might influence the way we approach our work as law student affairs professionals.

Thursday, June 1 - 3:15 p.m. Room 1457

 

Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence in Law School: The Link Between Mental Wellness and Academic Success

Jarrett Green, Adjunct Professor of Law and Co-Director of “Mindfulness, Stress Management, & Peak Performance” Program, Southwestern Law School
Rebecca A. Simon, Associate Professor of Law, Academic Success and Bar Related Programs, Co-Director of “Mindfulness, Stress Management, & Peak Performance” Program, Southwestern Law School

Participants will learn background principles and effective techniques for assisting law students who are struggling with the stressors and emotional difficulties that inevitably accompany the law school experience. The presentation will include both group discussion and solo exercises where participants will learn how to assist students in successfully managing their emotions and optimizing their overall performance and happiness in law school.

Friday, June 2 - 10:30 a.m. Room 1430

 

A Law School Mentoring Model: How Student Affairs Professionals Can Use Mentoring Principles to Support Marginalized Students

Catherine Matthews, Assistant Dean of Students, Indiana University Maurer School of Law
Johnny Pryor, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Elizabeth Ferrufino, Director of Student Affairs, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Mentoring relationships provide personal and professional development opportunities for students. Research shows that mentoring is especially important for marginalized students who often times lack the social and human capital required to be successful in school and in their subsequent professional careers. Although mentoring is commonly found in academia and in large law firms, it is not a common practice in legal education. Taking the graduate level faculty-student mentoring relationship model, this presentation will introduce participants to a functional mentoring model that can be used by student affairs professionals in law school. Through a presentation and interactive partner work, participants will learn to apply a law school tailored mentoring model to specifically support marginalized law students.

Friday, June 2 - 10:30 a.m. Room 1447

 

Student Development Theory Crash Course for Law School Student Affairs Professionals

Macey Lynd Edmondson, Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions & Scholarships, The University of Mississippi School of Law

Have you heard anyone mention student development theory in practice and wish you knew more about it? Do you feel like you have a handle on the “law” side of things, but not theoretical uses behind student affairs practices? The purpose of this crash course is to assist student affairs professionals in understanding models of student development and how theory can be used in professional practice in law school settings. Psychosocial, identity, cognitive-structural, and typology theories will be discussed. Participants will be able to use these theories when developing programs, advising students, or assisting student organizations. The use of theoretical framework will provide a foundation for many tasks faced by law school student affairs professionals.

Friday, June 2 - 2:30 p.m. Room 1347

 

Student Well-Being: Providing Autonomy Support by Helping Students Take Ownership of their Narrative – Their “Story” Coming to Law School, Being in Law School, and Moving beyond Law School

Jerry Organ, Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, University of St. Thomas, Minnesota School of Law
Rupa Bhandari, Assistant Dean for the Office of Career Management and Adjunct Law Professor, Santa Clara University School of Law

Law schools can do much to help students own their “story” – to connect their life narrative to their law school experience to their plans for being a legal professional. This is a specific way to address the lack of autonomy support that Sheldon and Krieger highlight as something that impacts well-being negatively. This presentation would highlight the Roadmap process we have implemented at St. Thomas which starts students on this process during spring semester of the first year and continues an ongoing dialogue with them through the remaining two years (through our mentor externship and reflection opportunities associated with the classroom component of that course). It also will include Rupa Bhandari discussing a different first-year program designed similarly to support law students owning their “story” and shaping their narrative through law school and beyond.

Friday, June 2 - 2:30 p.m. Room 1430

 

Planning Your Career in Student Affairs - Moving Up (or Beyond?) the Law School Ladder

Kendra E. Dane, Search Associate, Spelman and Johnson

It’s time to think about you and what you might want to do next in your career. Perhaps you haven’t looked at other positions lately – or you have looked and you’re not sure you are qualified. Maybe it’s time to think about other ways to use your knowledge and skills within student affairs more broadly. This session is designed to help you think outside the box and to consider some career alternatives for which you may actually be uniquely qualified!

Friday, June 2 - 2:30 p.m. Room 1447

 

Teaching Students to Report Misconduct in Law School and the Real World: The Role of Student Services Professionals

Janet Stearns, Dean of Students and Lecturer, University of Miami School of Law

We know that the legal profession is self-regulating, and that part of a lawyer's obligation is a duty to report misconduct. However, many of our students are afraid to come forward. We often deal with serious issues which include academic misconduct on exams or papers, issues involving drugs, alcohol or mental health concerns, and claims under Title IX relating to sexual misconduct or harassment. I am interested in developing methods and approaches for teaching students about the value of coming forward to report concerns and trying to appropriately respond to those concerns. Discussion will include reference to appropriate Honor Codes, state rules and Title IX reporting policies. After an overview of the topic, we will address some practical scenarios that regularly present, and a range of strategies for approaching these issues with our law students.

Friday, June 2 - 3:45 p.m. Room 1430

 

A More Perfect Union: How Combined Student Services Offices Can Prosper in an Age of Decreasing Budgets and Increasing Demands

Jessica Boynton, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
Pam Shea, Assistant Director of Student Life, University of North Dakota School of Law
Michael T. McCarthy, Director of Student Services, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Sarah M. Polly, Associate Dean for Student Services & Career Development, Case Western Reserve University School of Law

In an age of decreasing school budgets and increasing student demands, many student services offices find themselves combining efforts—willingly or otherwise—with partners in academic services, career services/development, admissions and more. Although these changes may bring challenges, they also offer the opportunity to streamline interdepartmental communication and improve the efficiency and reach of student programming and services. Through a panel presentation, group discussion, and interactive brainstorming, participants learn how deal with the challenges of and embrace the opportunities offered by combined service offices.

Friday, June 2 - 3:45 p.m. Room 1447

 

To Counsel or To Coach? Determining the Best Approach & Practices for Different Settings

Melissa Berry, Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services, University of Washington School of Law
Oscar Teran, Assistant Director of Career Services, Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law

The terms counseling and coaching are often used interchangeably in the law school context, but they are different approaches to working with students. While at a number of schools, career services professionals are now called coaches, the ability to coach is not limited to the career context. This interactive workshop will analyze how to determine which approach is best by reading situational cues and best practices. Coaching theory and techniques will be introduced with a “toolkit” approach for law school student affairs professionals to implement. Participants will have the opportunity to practice these techniques and get immediate feedback.

Saturday, June 3 - 9:15 a.m. Room 1447

 

Collaborative Processes for Determining Effective Accommodations in Law School

Lisa Ferreira, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs & Title IX Coordinator, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Emily Scivoletto, Assistant Dean for Student Services & Academic Affairs, UCLA School of Law

Providing effective accommodations that help our students is the goal of student affairs professionals. How do we process a student’s request for accommodations in light of our own law school practices and norms? This presentation/interactive workshop will focus on freestanding and university-centralized disability departments and how we determine what is reasonable and effective. Through the presentation and break-out groups, participants will learn how to evaluate their own practices to ensure the accommodation process is consistent, fair, and appropriate.

Saturday, June 3 - 9:15 a.m. Room 1457

 

NALSAP Business Meetings

NALSAP is a 501(c)(6) professional association for law student affairs professionals. To remain a strong organization, we must have active members who invest their time in shaping the goals, programs and events associated with NALSAP.

Currently, NALSAP has four officers leading the organization and an additional five Conference Committee members assisting with the first annual conference. But we need additional visionary professionals to step up and volunteer to take on leadership roles in the organization. Toward that end, we will have two NALSAP business meetings at the NALSAP Conference:

Meeting #1: Thursday, June 1st from 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. in Room 1347

Meeting #2: Friday, June 2nd from 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. in Room 1347

At these meetings we will select officers for 2017-2018, establish NALSAP committees and committee chairs, discuss the 2018 national conference date and location, and make other decisions leading to the success of NALSAP and its members.

Documents relevant to these conversations will be posted here and on the conference shared google drive.

Please plan to join these important discussions and lend your voice to the future of NALSAP!

 

Conference Committee

Meredith D'Angelo
Assistant Dean for Law Student Affairs
University of San Diego School of Law

Macey Edmondson
Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions and Scholarship
University of Mississippi School of Law

Lisa Ferreira
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Title IX Coordinator
Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Rebekah Grodsky
Director of Academic & Student Affairs
University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law

Catherine Matthews
Assistant Dean of Students
Indiana University, Maurer School of Law

Irene Meloney
Director for Law Student Affairs
University of San Diego School of Law

Darren Nealy
Director of Student Services
University of Michigan School of Law

Johnny Pryor
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Indiana University, McKinney School of Law

Emily Scivoletto
Assistant Dean for Student Services & Academic Affairs
UCLA School of Law

 

Presenter Information

NALSAP is grateful to the student affairs professionals, law school faculty and other educators coming from around the country to present at our inaugural conference in Los Angeles in June. Thank you!

Mitchell Bailin
Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
Georgetown University Law Center

Mitchell Bailin is the Associate Vice President and Dean of Students at Georgetown University Law Center, where he oversees a wide range of co-curricular programs, including student organizations and competition teams, residence life, wellness promotion, academic support, the Registrar's office and disability services. He also provides personal and academic advising; manages the school's response to urgent or concerning student situations; and develops, teaches and supervises a broad array of innovative professional formation programs. Prior to coming to Georgetown, Mitch practiced in the litigation department at Palmer & Dodge LLP in Boston, where he focused on the representation of schools and colleges. He also served as a law clerk to the Honorable Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court after graduating from Yale Law School.

Melissa Berry
Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services
University of Washington School of Law

Melissa Berry is the Assistant Dean for Student & Career Services at the University of Washington School of Law. In this capacity, she oversees academic advising, student organizations, student wellness, career planning, professional development, and the Gates Public Service Program. Melissa has twelve years of experience in legal education. Most recently, she served as Assistant Dean of Career Services at Chapman University Fowler School of Law, where she previously was an Associate Professor and directed the environmental law concentration program. Melissa also was a faculty member at UW Law and a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Missouri School of Law. Before moving into academia, she practiced law at Latham & Watkins in Washington, DC and at Perkins Coie LLP in Seattle. At Perkins, Melissa served as a pro bono fellow at TeamChild, a nonprofit civil legal services organization. Following law school, Melissa was a law clerk to the Honorable David B. Sentelle, US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and the Honorable Terence T. Evans, Chief Judge, US District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin. Melissa earned her JD from Northwestern University School of Law and BA from Tulane University.

Rupa Bhandari
Assistant Dean for the Office of Career Management and an Adjunct Law Professor
Santa Clara University School of Law

Rupa Bhandari is the Assistant Dean for the Office of Career Management and an Adjunct Law Professor at Santa Clara University School of Law. After graduating from Santa Clara, Rupa practiced at a mid-sized litigation firm in health law and employment law. While she enjoyed litigation, her favorite part was mentoring the 2L summer associates and working with the diversity committee to create a law school pipeline program. She then joined a small start-up firm before moving over to higher education in 2008. For 3 years she worked as the Associate Director for Career Development at UC Hastings College of the Law, and then moved over to Student Services first as the Director and then as the Assistant Dean of Student Services. While there she collaborated with other faculty and administrators to create a professional development curriculum for the 1Ls that included a written professional development plan and a coaching meeting to debrief the written plan. She also focused on leadership development, academic advising, and wellness for students (she also managed the Student Health Center). She won Administrator of the Year in 2011 as voted on by the students and then won Outstanding Contributions to the UC Hastings Community, with Distinction, in 2017 before coming back "home" to her alma mater.

Jessica Boynton
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs
University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Jessica Boynton serves as the Assistant Dean of Students at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Jessica joined Denver Law in 2015, following four years of service as the Director of Student Conduct at Colorado State University – Pueblo. In her role as Assistant Dean, Jessica organizes new student orientation, guides student organizations and the Student Bar Association, manages disability accommodations, plans graduation, serves as an academic advisor, and provides academic and personal support for students. Prior to joining higher education administration, Jessica was a practicing attorney for Banner & Bower P.C. and Davis Graham & Stubbs LLP. Jessica received her Juris Doctor from Denver Law in 2008, and her Bachelor of Science degree from Cornell University.

Kendra E. Dane
Search Associate
Spelman and Johnson

Kendra Dane is a search associate for Spelman Johnson, an executive search firm which provides search and consulting services to higher education institutions, including law schools. She earned her BA from Mundelein College (now part of Loyola University) and her MS from National Louis University. During a career in higher education that spans over 30 years, Kendra has most recently served as assistant dean and director of admissions at William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota. Prior to moving to St. Paul, she served as executive director of admissions and marketing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), as well as the executive director of enrollment services at SAIC. Kendra began her career in higher education at National Louis University in Evanston, Illinois, where she served as an associate vice president for financial aid for many years. Kendra has been active in the Illinois Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (ILASFAA), held leadership positions in Midwest Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (MASFAA), and served in a volunteer capacity as a financial aid trainer with the U.S. Department of Education.

Maura DeMouy
Director of Academic Success
Georgetown University Law Center

Maura DeMouy is Director of Academic Success in the Dean of Students Office at the Georgetown University Law Center. As part of her duties, she personally advises students, develops workshops on study skills, manages the peer tutor program and oversees wellness initiatives. Prior to coming to Georgetown, she was the Dean of Students at the Catholic University's Columbus School of Law. She also taught legal research and writing and worked on student formation projects at the University of Maryland School of Law. Prior to Maryland Law, she was an associate at Hogan & Hartson LLP.

Macey Lynd Edmondson
Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions & Scholarships
The University of Mississippi School of Law

Macey Edmondson is the Interim Assistant Dean for Admissions and Scholarships at the University of Mississippi. Previously, she was the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. She has a J.D. and received her Ph.D in Higher Education in 2013. She teaches student development theory classes for her university's online Ed.D program.

Laura Ferrari
Dean of Students
Suffolk University Law School

Laura Ferrari graduated from Babson College with a B.S. in management. She is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, earning her J.D. from Suffolk University Law School and M.B.A. from Suffolk’s Sawyer Business School. After a short time practicing in the fields of estates and environmental law, Ms. Ferrari returned to Suffolk by becoming the Assistant, and then Associate Director of the University’s learning center where she managed a staff of over 50 student employees in the University’s peer tutoring program. In 2000, she joined the Suffolk University Law School Dean of Students Office where she has served as the Assistant Dean of Students, Acting Dean of Students and since 2006, the Dean of Students. In this role, she counsels individual students and student groups, serves as the advisor to the Student Bar Association, is responsible for numerous student programs including new student orientation, and serves on several law school and university-wide committees, including the University’s incident team. Ms. Ferrari currently serves as the Vice President of the Board of Directors of Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers (LCL), the Massachusetts bar-funded lawyer assistance program.

Lisa Ferreira
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs & Title IX Coordinator
Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Lisa Ferreira is the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Title IX Coordinator at Thomas Jefferson School of Law. As Assistant Dean, she oversees the offices of ADA compliance and Title IX, serves as the Primary Designated Officer for international students, and provides academic and personal counseling. She has 30 plus years of experience in legal education within a standalone law school. Lisa has presented at AHEAD, AALS, and Pre-Law Advisors Meetings on issues relating to accommodations for students with disabilities, graduate advising for the bar, as well as mental health in law school. She earned a B.S. in Human Services and a MSC in Marriage, Child, and Family Therapy.

Elizabeth Ferrufino
Director of Student Affairs
Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Elizabeth Ferrufino is the director of student affairs at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. After graduating from Indiana University Maurer School of Law and passing the Indiana bar, Ferrufino began her graduate education in the Sociology Department, where she is currently completing her PhD in sociology. Her research focuses on the effects of race/ethnicity and gender in legal education and in the legal profession. Ferrufino’s master’s thesis is titled “Minority Women Lawyers’ Job Satisfaction: Intersectionality of Race and Gender”. As a graduate student, she served on the Sociology Department Graduate Recruitment Committee, the College Graduate Hearing Board, co-chaired the Race and Ethnic Relations Committee in Sociology, and was a graduate student mentor. Additionally, Ferrufino taught undergraduate introduction to sociology and GROUPS, a summer program for first generation, low-income, and underrepresented students. Currently, Ferrufino is a member of the American Sociological Association and the Law and Society Association, and she is a member of the GLB Speakers Bureau at Indiana University.

Cara Herrick Foerst
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Deputy Title IX Coordinator
Seton Hall Law School

Cara Foerst is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Seton Hall Law School. Prior to becoming Associate Dean, she served Seton Hall Law for 12 years as Dean of Students. As Associate Dean for Academic Affairs she oversees broadly all academic functions of the law school including curriculum planning, course schedules and teaching assignments, and management of adjunct and contract faculty. She is responsible for Student Services (including disability support), Enrollment Services (encompassing the Registrar and Bursar) Career Services and Academic Success. Student discipline and honor code matters are under her authority. In addition, she is Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Seton Hall University overseeing the Law School. Dean Foerst serves on numerous University and Law School committees including J.D. Blended/On-line Learning (co-chair), Curriculum, Students of Concern (chair), Bar Exam Initiatives (co-chair), Academic Credentials, Graduation Committee, Critical Incident Management Team and the Diversity Council. She served on the Law School’s Dean Search Committee in 2014 - 15. She has taught in the Academic Success program and presents programs on learning and studying in law school, professionalism, student life and passing the bar. Dean Foerst has extensive experience planning large scale events involving high profile speakers. Dean Foerst is a 1999 graduate of Seton Hall Law and a 1996 graduate of St. Bonaventure University.

Jarrett Green
Adjunct Professor of Law and Co-Director of “Mindfulness, Stress Management, & Peak Performance” Program
Southwestern Law School

Jarrett Green is a Berkeley Law (Boalt Hall) graduate who practiced high-stakes business litigation for 12 years – first at Skadden Arps, and then in operating his own business litigation firm. Jarrett eventually decided to transition away from the practice of law so that he could live his purpose of working with lawyers and other professionals in high-stress environments to help reduce their stress and emotional suffering, and help improve their joyfulness, emotional balance, cognitive performance, and overall success. Jarrett has completed a variety of certifications and programs in mindfulness, meditation, applied psychology, stress management, behavioral modification, interpersonal communication, corporate leadership, business coaching, peak performance, and emotional wellness. He is also certified by the State Bar of California to provide Continuing Legal Education programs to lawyers on mindfulness, stress management, and cognitive enhancement.Jarrett provides his services to a variety of corporations, such as Tesla Motors and Zenith Insurance Company, as well as to law firms, law schools, lawyers, and corporate executives. He also serves as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, where he co-founded and co-teaches the Mindfulness, Stress Management and Peak Performance Program.

DeShun Harris
Assistant Director of Academic Support
Texas A&M University School of Law

DeShun Harris is Assistant Director of Academic Support and Bar Services at Texas A&M University School of Law. Her scholarly interests include learning cues, retrieval, and the use of critical reflection to improve instruction.

Connie Horton, PhD
Associate Vice President for Student Life
Senior Director, Counseling, Health, and Wellness,
Licensed Psychologist
Pepperdine University

Dr. Horton is the Associate Vice President for Student Life at Pepperdine University and oversees all aspects of the university’s counseling, health and wellness programs. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas-Austin, a Master of Science degree in counseling from California State University and a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from Pepperdine University. She served for over ten years as a tenured faculty member within the department of psychology at Illinois State University. She is a licensed psychologist and an member of the American Psychological Association and the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors. Dr. Horton frequently lectures and provides trainings for professionals who are not mental health professionals, but who are in need of tools to provide health and wellness counsel on a limited basis.

Jennah Jones
Executive Director of Student Affairs
UC Irvine School of Law

Dr. Jennah Jones serves as the Executive Director of Student Affairs at the University of California, Irvine School of Law. She has a B.A. in Sociology from the University of San Diego, a M.S. in Higher Education from Syracuse University, and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from the University of Southern California.

David Jaffe
Associate Dean for Student Affairs
American University Washington College of Law

David Jaffe is Associate Dean for Student Affairs at American University Washington College of Law. In his work on wellness issues among law students over the last decade, Jaffe has served on the D.C. Bar Lawyer Assistance Program including as its chair, and continues to serve on the ABA Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs (CoLAP) as co-chair of the Law School Assistance Committee. He has spoken on a number of panels on this topic, and recently co-authored “Suffering in Silence: The Survey of Law Student Well-Being and the Reluctance of Law Students to Seek Help for Substance Use and Mental Health Concerns. Jaffe received a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis and his J.D. from American University Washington College of Law.

Catherine L. Matthews
Assistant Dean of Students
Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Catherine Matthews is the assistant dean of students at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Dean Matthews earned her J.D. at Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington, and she earned her Ph.D. in higher education at Indiana University. Dean Matthews wrote her dissertation on issues of tort liability for colleges and universities. Prior to becoming assistant dean of students, she worked for Indiana University's Office of General Counsel and served as the law school’s director of student affairs. Dean Matthews gained extensive teaching experience, primarily at the university level. A proud Tennessean, she moved from her home state to South Korea, where she taught English. After returning to the United States, she has taught academic writing, critical reading and reasoning, and legal issues in higher education. In addition to her administrative duties, she teaches two courses at the law school—Higher Education Law and Gender and Law. Today, Dean Matthews is a member of the Indiana Bar and serves as a pro bono attorney in South Central Indiana; she facilitates professional development workshops for organizations, including Human Resources. She is a trustee for the Alpha Gamma Delta Foundation and she serves as the board president of Girls Inc. of Monroe County.

Michael T. McCarthy
Director of Student Services
Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Michael T. McCarthy is the Director of Student Services at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Michael joined CWRU in 2011, working in the Career Development Office and transitioning to Student Services when the two offices merged in October 2015. In his current role, Michael has helped to develop and pilot the law school's Mentoring Alumni Program and facilitates Diversity 360 sessions to students, staff, and faculty across campus. He is a member of the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, where he serves on the Law Student Working Group. A member of NALP, Michael presented on foreign graduate student counseling at the 2014 Annual Education Conference, has written for the NALP Bulletin, and served as Vice Chair for several Newer Professionals Section committees. Michael is active in his community, serving as a trustee for the Sussex Neighborhood Community Association and with the Shaker Heights Fathers Committee. Prior to joining CWRU, he worked in the litigation department at Steptoe & Johnson, PLLC's Charleston, West Virginia office. Michael received his Juris Doctor from Washington and Lee University and his Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Washington & Jefferson College.

Markeisha J. Miner
Dean of Students
Cornell Law School

Markeisha J. Miner is Dean of Students at Cornell Law School. Previously, she served as Assistant Dean of Career Services and Outreach at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, overseeing all aspects of career planning and professional development. Before becoming a law school administrator, Markeisha practiced as a commercial litigator in Dickinson Wright PLLC’s Detroit office, where she was an inaugural member of the firm’s diversity committee and clerked for the Hon. Anna Diggs Taylor on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. She is a member of several bar and law-related organizations, including the American Bar Association, Association for American Law Schools’ Student Services Section, National Bar Association, NALP, and the State Bar of Michigan. Markeisha earned her B.A., magna cum laude, at Mount Holyoke College and her J.D. at the University of Michigan Law School.

Kalianne Neumann
Doctoral Student in Learning, Design, and Technology
University of Georgia

Kalianne L. Neumann is a Ph.D. student and graduate assistant of Learning, Design, and Technology in the Department of Career and Information Studies at the University of Georgia.

Jerry Organ
Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions
University of St. Thomas, Minnesota School of Law

Jerry Organ currently serves as Co-Director of the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions along with Professor Neil Hamilton. He became one of the founding faculty members of the University of St. Thomas School of Law in 2001. Prior to joining St. Thomas, he taught for ten years at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law. Before entering teaching he clerked for Justice William Callow of the Wisconsin Supreme Court and worked for five years at Foley and Lardner in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In addition to the work he does with Prof. Neil Hamilton to foster greater emphasis on professional identity formation in legal education, his research is directed toward transparency in financial aspects of the decision to attend law school – addressing both scholarship programs for students and employment and salary data of graduates. He also tracks application and enrollment trends for law schools and has analyzed attrition data, transfer trends and issues associated with bar passage. In addition, he was one of the principal investigators on the Survey of Law Student Well Being, results of which were published recently in the Journal of Legal Education.

Sarah M. Polly
Associate Dean for Student Services & Career Development
Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Sarah McFarlane Polly is the Associate Dean for Student Services and Career Development at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. She has worked in several positions at the law school since starting there as assistant director for career services in 2000. Sarah is an active member of several law school committees, including the Admissions, Diversity, and Curriculum committees. She also serves on several Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association committees, including Bar Admissions and Lawyers’ Mental Health and Wellness, and has been a presenter on topics relating to law student mental health and diversity pipeline programs at bar association programs. Since 2008 she has been the lead administrator for the Stephanie Tubbs Jones Summer Legal Academy, a high school program that aims to increase diversity in the legal profession. Prior to joining Case Western, Sarah practiced law for four years – three years with Southeastern Ohio Legal Services and one year with Jones Day. She has also worked for a number of non-profit organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio and the Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Metro Cleveland. Sarah received her Juris Doctor from Ohio State University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Psychology from Bennington College.

Johnny D. Pryor
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Johnny Pryor is the assistant dean for student affairs at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. He earned his J.D. at Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington. After law school, Dean Pryor served as an Assistant Clark County Prosecutor in Springfield, Ohio. He worked primarily in the civil division providing legal counsel to county boards, departments, and elected officials on areas of law such as employment, real estate, zoning, and contracts. Since 2005, Dean Pryor has served in various roles providing leadership for programs designed to assist undergraduates interested in law school and other graduate programs at Butler University and Dartmouth College. He has advised hundreds of students from diverse backgrounds helping them gain admission to some of the most selective law and graduate programs. In addition, he served as an adjunct instructor at Wittenberg University where he taught both law and literature, as well as critical reasoning and the law. He is past treasurer of the American Mock Trial Association, and former at-large board member of the Northeast Association of Pre-Law Advisors. Recently, Dean Pryor completed a two-year term on the executive committee of the Association of American Law Schools Student Services Section, and he currently serves as founding president of the National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals.

Ann McGonigle Santos
Associate Dean of Students
Suffolk University Law School

Ann McGonigle Santos is Associate Dean of Students as well as Disability Services Coordinator for Suffolk University Law School in Boston, MA. A graduate of Brown University and Northeastern University School of Law, she joined the Middlesex County District Attorney’s Office in Cambridge, MA where she handled a variety of cases ranging from Domestic Violence to Child Sexual Assault to Murder. Ann then joined the Legal Practice Skills faculty of Suffolk University School of Law in 1998, as an Associate Professor of Legal Writing for 16 years before joining the Dean of Students Office in 2014. In this role she works alongside Laura Ferrari in handling a myriad of student issues as well as working with all students with Disabilities.

Emily Scivoletto
Assistant Dean for Student Services & Academic Affairs
UCLA School of Law

Emily Scivoletto is the Assistant Dean for Student Services and Academic Affairs at the UCLA School of Law. In this capacity, Emily oversees the Office for Student Affairs which provides support for students throughout their time at UCLA Law. She regularly presents workshops and meets with students to provide academic advising, personal counseling, and guidance on student life & activities, diver­sity and inclusion issues, state bar licensure and overall success in law school. She previously taught and served as Director of Academic Success at UC Davis and McGeorge Law Schools, and served as Dean of Students at USD Law School. Prior to entering academia she practiced law in Sac­ramento for six years, where she handled insurance defense and civil rights litigation cases. She holds a J.D. degree from Pacific McGeorge School of Law, an M.A. degree in Higher Education from California State University Sacramento and a B.A. degree from UC Irvine. Emily is a founding member and the Treasurer of the National Association of Law Student Affairs Professionals.

Pam Shea
Assistant Director of Student Life
University of North Dakota School of Law

Pam Shea is the Assistant Director of Student Life at University of North Dakota School of Law. Pam joined UND School of Law in 2011, when they created her position merging Student Life with Career Development. In her role, she works primarily with programming, student organizations, career development and admissions/recruitment. Pam serves as the President of UND Staff Senate, and is a member of UND University Senate and President’s Cabinet. Prior to joining the School of Law, she worked with the College of Nursing and Professional Development at UND as the Graduate Program Specialist, assisting with admissions, retention and student records. Pam received her Master of Science degree in Educational Leadership – Higher Education from University of North Dakota and her Bachelor of Science degree in Childhood Studies Education from Plymouth State University.

Rebecca A. Simon
Associate Professor of Law, Academic Success and Bar Related Programs, Co-Director of “Mindfulness, Stress Management, & Peak Performance” Program
Southwestern Law School

Rebecca Ann Simon is a member of the California Bar and an Associate Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles. Professor Simon is currently the Co-Chair of the American Association of Law Schools - Balance Section’s Mindfulness Affinity Group (MAG), bringing together law faculty interested in contemplative practices from all over the country. Professor Simon is also the Executive Director of the Mindfulness In Law Society (MILS), a new national non-profit organization dedicated to promoting mindfulness practices in all sectors of the legal community (www.mindfulnessinlawsociety.com). Professor Simon’s experience with mindfulness, contemplative practices, and SEL education includes: a decade as a practitioner; meditation training retreats at a Silent Stay Center in Northern California (2015; 2016); completion of the Executive Mind series courses (I, II, and III) at the Drucker School of Management (2012-2013); a week-long training event with a scholarship at UC-Berkeley (July, 2016), achieving a Certificate from the Greater Good Science Center’s Summer Institute for Educators; teaching “Mindfulness Mondays” for Southwestern Law School (2014–to-date), and is Co-Director, along with Professor Jarrett A. Green, of Southwestern Law School’s innovative “Stress Management, and Peak Performance Program.” More information: www.swlaw.edu/mindfulness

Alex Sklut
Associate Director of Student Affairs
University of Georgia School of Law

Alex D. Sklut currently serves as the school’s associate director of student affairs. In this role, she is responsible for conduct-related disciplinary matters. She also manages all reasonable disability-related accommodations as well as oversees and advises all law school student organizations and the student organization budget process as well as coordinating and dispersing information to students regarding course selection and registration. She provides support and referrals to students who experience personal difficulties while enrolled at Georgia Law. Sklut also oversees Georgia Law’s mentorship programming. Sklut initially joined the law school’s staff in 2011 as a part-time coordinator in the law school’s Dean Rusk International Law Center and as a Fellow for the Georgia Law at Oxford program. She joined the law school staff full time in 2013, first as graduate admissions coordinator, then as assistant director of graduate legal studies. Sklut also served as the study abroad coordinator for the 2013 Georgia Law Summer Program in China. After a brief period working as director of LL.M. services at the George Mason University School of Law in Arlington, Virginia, she returned to Georgia Law in her current position in the fall of 2015. Sklut earned her bachelor’s degree with distinction from Emory University in both business administration and educational studies in 2008. She then earned her Juris Doctor cum laude from UGA.

Janet Stearns
Dean of Students and Lecturer
University of Miami School of Law

Janet Stearns joined the University of Miami Law School in October, 1999 as director of International and Foreign Graduate Programs. In 2007 she was appointed Dean of Students. Since 2011, Dean Stearns also teaches Professional Responsibility each fall and spring semester. At the University of Miami, she serves as Deputy Title IX Coordinator, a member of the President’s Coalition on Sexual Violence Prevention and Education, a member of the President’s Commission on Alcohol and Other Drugs, and a member of the Wellness Center Advisory Board. Dean Stearns recently joined the Executive Committee of the AALS Student Services Section. Dean Stearns has been passionate about wellness initiatives at the Law School, including the Fall Wellness Week, the spring Mental Health Day, and a weekly Dean of Students Constitutional (walk) around the campus. She coordinates closely with the School’s Mindfulness in Law program, and drafted the Preface to Scott Roger’s book Mindfulness for Law Students (Mindful Living Press, 2009). A native of New York, she is a graduate of Yale College (1984) and Yale Law School (1988). She was admitted to the bar in Connecticut (1989) and Washington (1994).

Oscar Teran
Assistant Director of Career Services
Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law

Oscar Teran is the Assistant Director for Career Services at Chapman University, Dale E. Fowler School of Law in Orange County, California. Within the Career Office, Oscar focuses on supporting students who are pursuing careers in public interest law as well as serving international LL.M. students. Prior to joining Fowler School of Law, Oscar was the Director of the Alumni Mentor Program at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. In that role, Oscar connected students and alumni for mentorship, individually counseled students on career development strategies, and lectured on professional development topics. In recognition of his work on behalf of students, Oscar was awarded Staff Member of The Year in 2015 by the Hastings Public Interest Law Foundation. Before becoming a law school career professional, Oscar spent five years advocating for the rights of indigent clients as a civil litigator with Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, California Rural Legal Assistance, and Bay Area Legal Aid. Oscar holds a J.D. from UC Hastings and a B.A. in Political Science and Sociology from Chapman University.

Colin Watrin
Assistant Director, Admissions & Student Life
Seattle University School of Law

Colin Watrin is the Assistant Director for Admissions and Student Life at the Seattle University School of Law. In this role he advises student organizations, supports personal and professional training opportunities, and leads efforts related to retention and diversity programming. Colin is also part of the SU Law admissions team, reviewing files, counseling prospective students, and traveling to recruitment events. Colin previously worked with Parent and Family Programs in the Vice President for Student Affairs Office at Colorado State University, and as a Senior Admissions Counselor at Western Washington University. He holds a M.S. in Student Affairs in Higher Education, and a B.A. in Sociology & Communication. Outside of work Colin follows his passion for civic engagement and leadership development as a volunteer for organizations like Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership, and United Way, promoting engagement and leadership for high school students.